View Full Version : Winter camping "Tip of the Day"



tat
01-29-2007, 10:08 PM
A few people (like me!) are new to camping in the snow and have some questions and concerns about what to bring and do when camping in snow, so I thought I'd start a thread asking the experts out there for some practical advice.

I'll start with a quote from another website:

"Always use a pad under your sleeping bag in the winter. Many people suggest two pads. Insulating yourself from the ground is more important than insulating yourself from the cold air."

I've heard it is not a good idea to use an air mattress because the air inside free to move and actually conducts heat away from the body rather than insulate it.

Hiram357
01-30-2007, 12:05 AM
The Hiram tip-o-the day!

Invest in a "Mr. Buddy" heater, it's light, it's portable, and it's 9000BTUs of beautiful glowin red heat!

It has a knockover safety that will shut itself off in case of a tipover, and it also has a low oxeygen cutout so that you wont suffocate yourself in your tent! I used it in a 6 person dome tent this fall, it got down into the 30s at night and we were toasty warm with it on the low setting.

extended tip: leave the beer cooler outside, but within arms reach of the front zipper (I usually place my sleeping bag by the flap just for this reason)

:D

vicbiker
01-30-2007, 09:41 AM
My first winter camping experience was in 1962 while in the boy scouts.We built lean-tos out of hemlock broughs and also insulated the bottom with hemlock tips.Later in life while ice fishing on Allagash Lake we would use these same principals.Building shelters out of fir broughs and burying that with lots of snow.We still used the brough tips for insulating the floor.If laid in carefully they can be quite comfortable to sleep on.

Nowadays I like to use a self inflating pad.These are close cell air mattresses(not to be confuse with the air mattresses you take to the beach)combined with an egg crate or foam pad under it.For the best insulating qualities I don't think you can beat foam pads all by themselves.My old bones just like the comfort of the self inflating pads.

I'm a restless sleeper and have a hard time staying on the pad.Rolling onto the cold floor in the night will wake you suddenly.If you have this problem too, I would suggest the widest pad posssible.If using a sled to haul your gear and weight is not a issue a packing quilt or heavy blanket works great for a bottom layer with a pad on top of it.(some people I know use a pillow top mattres for the bottom layer,but I'll never tell)

WhereRWe?
01-30-2007, 09:50 AM
extended tip: leave the beer cooler outside, but within arms reach of the front zipper (I usually place my sleeping bag by the flap just for this reason)

:D

But remember - beer WILL freeze! ;) ;)

vicbiker
01-30-2007, 09:52 AM
Hiram I have no experience with these heaters,but it sounds like you have check out the safety concerns that come to mind.After reading of the two articles in the paper lately of carbon monoxide poisoning in our state it just worries me.

Back in my beer drinking days we simply burried the beer in the snow to keep it from freezing.Just outside of the tent of course in case of an emergency!!:D:D

firefighterjake
01-30-2007, 10:18 AM
The Hiram tip-o-the day!

Invest in a "Mr. Buddy" heater, it's light, it's portable, and it's 9000BTUs of beautiful glowin red heat!

It has a knockover safety that will shut itself off in case of a tipover, and it also has a low oxeygen cutout so that you wont suffocate yourself in your tent! I used it in a 6 person dome tent this fall, it got down into the 30s at night and we were toasty warm with it on the low setting.

extended tip: leave the beer cooler outside, but within arms reach of the front zipper (I usually place my sleeping bag by the flap just for this reason)

:D

My parents had a propane heater that they used while camping occasionally when I was a kid . . . which is strange since we only went camping in the Summer (perhaps that's back in the days when Maine had real winters that lasted all the way until the 4th of July.)

Personally, I'm not a big fan of those heaters . . . I know they have safety devices built in, but somehow it just doesn't seem overly safe to bring a device into a tent that is designed to generate heat (and as a result possibly carbon monoxide) . . . but again that's just me . . . call me Fire Marshal Bill. :D

firefighterjake
01-30-2007, 10:19 AM
On a side note . . . and not to get off topic (although I often tend to do so) . . . I thought of you Vicbiker last Friday since I was cruising through the Abbot area as I went from Newport to Greenville and back on the sled.

vicbiker
01-30-2007, 05:03 PM
On a side note . . . and not to get off topic (although I often tend to do so) . . . I thought of you Vicbiker last Friday since I was cruising through the Abbot area as I went from Newport to Greenville and back on the sled.Some of the local riders are planning to lead some rides around some of our local trails the weekend of the camping event.Abbot has some nice areas besides the 90 mph highway to Greenville.Might be worth checking it out!!

Hiram357
01-30-2007, 05:33 PM
But remember - beer WILL freeze! ;) ;)

WHAT!?!?! You let is sit out long enough to freeze???:p

Hiram357
01-30-2007, 05:38 PM
Hiram I have no experience with these heaters,but it sounds like you have check out the safety concerns that come to mind.After reading of the two articles in the paper lately of carbon monoxide poisoning in our state it just worries me.

Back in my beer drinking days we simply burried the beer in the snow to keep it from freezing.Just outside of the tent of course in case of an emergency!!:D:D

It's a really nice little unit, I heavily studied the product reviews of it before I bought one because I had a lot of safety concerns about a heater in a tent. I even tested it in my apartment before actaully using it, knocking it over and letting it run a few hours to check for any hot spots, ect... (it's a lot safer than those little coleman ones on wire legs)

and yes, it is very important to plan ahead in case of an emergency! just remember that there is a difference between the funnel with tube in front of tent and the funnel with tube in the back of tent! :eek: :eek:

Hiram357
01-30-2007, 05:40 PM
My parents had a propane heater that they used while camping occasionally when I was a kid . . . which is strange since we only went camping in the Summer (perhaps that's back in the days when Maine had real winters that lasted all the way until the 4th of July.)

Personally, I'm not a big fan of those heaters . . . I know they have safety devices built in, but somehow it just doesn't seem overly safe to bring a device into a tent that is designed to generate heat (and as a result possibly carbon monoxide) . . . but again that's just me . . . call me Fire Marshal Bill. :D

The unit itself is pretty foolproof, the safety switches are very basic (very little margin of malfunction) 9 times outta 10 it's the user that causes the problem. :rolleyes:

attroll
01-31-2007, 03:45 AM
Jake

Sounds like we should hook up and bring our sleds up there and mingle for a while then we could go out riding and come back at the end of the day. We do not have to stay the night. We could just ride and mingle. You know we will stay warm riding. So what do you say?

I am going to try and make the event if there is snow. I am undecided about spending the night though. It would be a little cold in my hammock I think. I may bring it and give it a try though.

vicbiker
01-31-2007, 06:04 AM
Jake

Sounds like we should hook up and bring our sleds up there and mingle for a while then we could go out riding and come back at the end of the day. We do not have to stay the night. We could just ride and mingle. You know we will stay warm riding. So what do you say?

I am going to try and make the event if there is snow. I am undecided about spending the night though. It would be a little cold in my hammock I think. I may bring it and give it a try though.There will be a nice warm fire going all day.The abbot snowmobile clud house will be open(they serve lunches)thet day.There are motels in the area for anyone wanting to stay without camping out.You snowmobilers can always ride home in the dark unless you are scared of the dark like Hiram.:D:D:D

firefighterjake
01-31-2007, 09:05 AM
Jake

Sounds like we should hook up and bring our sleds up there and mingle for a while then we could go out riding and come back at the end of the day. We do not have to stay the night. We could just ride and mingle. You know we will stay warm riding. So what do you say?

I am going to try and make the event if there is snow. I am undecided about spending the night though. It would be a little cold in my hammock I think. I may bring it and give it a try though.

I might be interested . . . remind me a few days before the event . . . although you do know my stand on geocaching events, right? :D

Trezurs*-R-*Fun
01-31-2007, 09:38 AM
I. . . remind me a few days before the event . . . although you do know my stand on geocaching events, right? :D


That you're socially impaired and hate people???? LOL:eek: :eek: :eek:

firefighterjake
01-31-2007, 01:17 PM
That you're socially impaired and hate people???? LOL:eek: :eek: :eek:

See
Rick, Steve remembers! :D

attroll
01-31-2007, 03:13 PM
I might be interested . . . remind me a few days before the event . . . although you do know my stand on geocaching events, right? :D

Jake

I remember your stand on events. We do not have to make this and all day mingle. Here are my thoughts and itinerary on this. The event starts at 9 am. So we could show up at about 9:30 or a little later. This way everyone would be at the camping area already. We could do this because we know it only takes up about 5 minutes to unload our sleds and be off and it will take the people going to the event a lot longer to get there stuff out of the car and organized before they hike into the camping area. Here is my idea and the time table could be different if we start earlier or later.

09:30 arrive and unload sleds
09:32 At the even and mingle for 15 to 20 minutes or longer
10:00 Head out from the event
Head to Pittston Farm for lunch (you know this is awesome)
We have two options from here.
Option 1, head to Kokadjo and back to Greenville and to the event and on.
Option 2, head back to Greenville and to the event and on.

Jake thing that we could do is to ask some of the users from the Maine Sledder web site who just bought GPS's to come with us and join in on the ride.

firefighterjake
01-31-2007, 04:05 PM
Jake

I remember your stand on events. We do not have to make this and all day mingle. Here are my thoughts and itinerary on this. The event starts at 9 am. So we could show up at about 9:30 or a little later. This way everyone would be at the camping area already. We could do this because we know it only takes up about 5 minutes to unload our sleds and be off and it will take the people going to the event a lot longer to get there stuff out of the car and organized before they hike into the camping area. Here is my idea and the time table could be different if we start earlier or later.

09:30 arrive and unload sleds
09:32 At the even and mingle for 15 to 20 minutes or longer
10:00 Head out from the event
Head to Pittston Farm for lunch (you know this is awesome)
We have two options from here.
Option 1, head to Kokadjo and back to Greenville and to the event and on.
Option 2, head back to Greenville and to the event and on.

Jake thing that we could do is to ask some of the users from the Maine Sledder web site who just bought GPS's to come with us and join in on the ride.

Intriguing . . . keep me in mind . . . and hope and pray that we get some more snow.

tat
01-31-2007, 07:50 PM
Today's tip: Don't breath into your sleeping bag. Your breath has a lot of moisture and if you get too much in your bag, it will reduce it's insulation value. Keeping dry keeps you warm!

If any of the sledders out there have some advice specific to gear and techniques for sledders, feel free to join in! You can haul a lot more stuff in a sled than snowshoers can. It's likely that you would gear up differently.

vicbiker
01-31-2007, 08:21 PM
Tat as you know some people have a lot more hot air in thier breath then others.....:D:D Those people might want to consider sleeping with there heads outside of the tent......:D:D

Haffy
01-31-2007, 09:16 PM
I hijacked this from another website and it has some good info regarding winter camping.

Winter hiking with an overnight or two?

1ST: KNOW THE LOCAL UPCOMING WEATHER BETTER THAN THE LOCAL WEATHER FORECASTER DOES and plan on it being ten degrees colder than anyone is predicting. Winter camping is very gear intensive - you might be able to get away with a 3 season tent if you are 100% sure there will not be falling snow BUT you'd still want at least a -20 degree bag. You'll need a closed cell pad AND a inflatable foam pad, the first to insulate you from the frozen ground and the other to provide additional insulation and comfort. (One needs to protect themselves more from the frozen ground than from the air in winter) Spend more time packing down the snow for your tent than a reasonable person probably would and you'll sleep much warmer. Pack but DO NOT clear away the snow as it is a great insulator. Must haves: silk underwear, very good boots (Well insulated with a plastic shell much preferred) PLENTY of layers, two VERY good pairs of mittens/gloves with full synthetic liners, two hats, wool socks, ear warmers, a balaclava, a waterproof/near waterproof soft shell, etc etc. NO COTTON ANYTHING!!

Cooking: make SURE you get a four-season mix if you're hiking in with a propane/butane stove and relying on it for drinking water and cooking. Easy prep, high calorie, high carb food should be the only items on the menu. :)

Liquids: Gatorade freezes at a lower temp than water does (high sodium content) so use it exclusively if need be; it's readily available in powder form and easy to carry. You need to HAVE TO stay hydrated in winter... even more so in the summer. Humidity levels can fall to near zero when it's below freezing and you will lose a good part of your fluids by just exhaling when you breathe. To boot, you need plenty of fliuds just to maintain and generate body heat. Make sure you wrap your water bottle and bring plenty of fuel if you do not know if you will have access to liquid water; melting snow for fluids will quickly drain your fuel stock. Want to live? Keep the BOOZE at home as it deregulates your perceived body temp, causing you to feel warmer than you really are. A few drinks?? A casually bad idea can potentially turn deadly very quickly.

Good firewood can also be hard to come by in the winter so do not rely on it as a heating or a cooking source. It's enough to warm your hands and face and maintain your spirits but not much beyond that.

Remember: early March might sound like the beginning of spring down here but up there, it's still very much winter. Leave your dog at home on this one! Most dogs are now just as domesticated as we are and cannot reasonably handle a winter overnight without proper shelter and good bedding.

With this event? Unless you're feeling particularly robust and already well stocked with winter gear OR looking at unseasonably warm temps for the outing, you might just want to make a day of it, hang out for the campfire and trek back to the car before the night really settles in.

dí76
01-31-2007, 10:10 PM
My winter tip is dont eat yellow snow:D :p

tat
01-31-2007, 10:31 PM
Pack but DO NOT clear away the snow as it is a great insulator.
I've heard just the opposite! If the ground did not get a hard freeze before the snow fell, it is warmer than the snow. So, clearing the snow away actually makes it warmer. I don't know who is right or if it really matters.



Good firewood can also be hard to come by in the winter so do not rely on it as a heating or a cooking source.

VicBiker is getting us plenty of wood!! Thanks Vic!!

vicbiker
02-01-2007, 09:08 AM
I think I was the one who told you about sleeping on the ground in the winter.I watch a program last winter on survival in Alaska.They showed thermal imaging pictures taken from a helicopter.The people sleeping on the snow the only heat that showed up was from there body shapes.The people on the ground showed a warm glow from the earth around there body shapes.This study said the ground as long as it wasn't frozen would be 38 degrees.I haven't tried it yet but hopeto this winter.

vicbiker
02-01-2007, 09:46 AM
This I think is the most important subject on winter camping.If you are wet you are cold!!With any winter activities staying dry is the hardest thing to do.You have two choice's.The first one is to bring plenty of changes of clothes.The second way is to stay dry.This is the hard one to learn how to do.With todays clothes it's easier then ever,but still very hard.The secret is to stay just to the cool side of comfortable.Once you start feeling warm and comfortable its usually to late,you're already sweaty.Pay close attention to how warm you feel,as you warm up start by taking off gloves,then your hat and finally layers of clothing on your upper body.If you can keep from sweating you'll always be warm when you stop for a break. Now if I could just learn to do what I preach!!!

tat
02-01-2007, 01:28 PM
I think I was the one who told you about sleeping on the ground in the winter.I watch a program last winter on survival in Alaska.They showed thermal imaging pictures taken from a helicopter.The people sleeping on the snow the only heat that showed up was from there body shapes.The people on the ground showed a warm glow from the earth around there body shapes.This study said the ground as long as it wasn't frozen would be 38 degrees.I haven't tried it yet but hopeto this winter.

I did hear this from you Vic, but I've heard it elsewhere too. I'm not sure I really understand it exactly. We won't be in a "survival" situtation. We (at least I will :) ) have a lot more padding than the minimum needed so it won't matter if the ground is a few degrees colder.

The part I do not understand is: where do you find ground that is not frozen? If you sleep on the ground, it may warm up to 38, but wouldn't that tend to make it wet? In Maine, the frost goes down 4 to 6 feet!

I like your last comment! The best way to find anything out is to make a reasonable plan and try it out in safe conditions. There are probably a lot of trade offs with either way.

vicbiker
02-01-2007, 05:12 PM
The part I do not understand is: where do you find ground that is not frozen? If you sleep on the ground, it may warm up to 38, but wouldn't that tend to make it wet? In Maine, the frost goes down 4 to 6 feet!
When the snow comes early like its suppose to it insulate the ground so it doesn't freeze.You are absolutely right about digging down to frozen ground,all you would accomplish is mud.

tat
02-01-2007, 08:13 PM
"Attach 4' - 6' of cord to each of your tent stake-out points so you can use rocks or logs for anchors if the ground is too frozen to drive in stakes or the snow is too soft to hold a stake."

tat
02-05-2007, 08:32 PM
Three-season tents may not be sturdy enough to handle the high winds and snow buildup that sometimes accompany winter storms. They may also be too ventilated to provide much shelter from a blowing storm.

On the other hand, with "mild" winter weather, three-season tents can work fine for winter camping.

I used a summer tent and it worked ok, but it was a bit cramped. Maybe I had a bit too much padding. :)

Hiram357
02-05-2007, 08:49 PM
I used a summer tent and it worked ok, but it was a bit cramped. Maybe I had a bit too much padding. :)

Did your summer tent have any uncloseable screens or vents? I have two 3 season tents, but im not sure if i want to use them because they both have screens that arent closeable and I dont think a tarp over them would provide adequate wind protection if it's blowin breezy that night.

tat
02-05-2007, 09:19 PM
Did your summer tent have any uncloseable screens or vents? I have two 3 season tents, but im not sure if i want to use them because they both have screens that arent closeable and I dont think a tarp over them would provide adequate wind protection if it's blowin breezy that night.

It's a typical two wall construction, the inner is just screen and the outer is water proof. It did not keep any heat in, I'm sure. I thought about "banking" it, but it may not be rugged enough. Besides, the night we went was so calm, it would not have made much difference.

Kaching Karen
02-05-2007, 09:25 PM
I also took a three season tent with me and have camped in the winter often using a variety of three season tents. As long as you aren't on the ledges of a mountain top where the wind is going to go right through you, you'd probably be okay.

One thing I do to keep warm, is take Nalgene bottles to bed with me that have been filled with boiling water. Make sure the lid is on tight and put them in a sock. In the morning, you have water that will boil quickly because it's still warm and you can brush your teeth right away because the water has been sanitized. Then, when everyone is wondering how you got your coffee and oatmeal so quick, you can putter around the campsite.

Hiram357
02-05-2007, 09:28 PM
I also took a three season tent with me and have camped in the winter often using a variety of three season tents. As long as you aren't on the ledges of a mountain top where the wind is going to go right through you, you'd probably be okay.

One thing I do to keep warm, is take Nalgene bottles to bed with me that have been filled with boiling water. Make sure the lid is on tight and put them in a sock. In the morning, you have water that will boil quickly because it's still warm and you can brush your teeth right away because the water has been sanitized. Then, when everyone is wondering how you got your coffee and oatmeal so quick, you can putter around the campsite.


that sounds like a pretty handy tip (i think ill have to steal stef's nalgenes), a lot better than the traditional rocks from around the campfire.... have you ever tried putting rocks on your oatmeal? :D

vicbiker
02-06-2007, 10:27 AM
I have one four season tent and a couple of three season tents.I've used both for winter camping.The only problem you might normally incounter using a three season tent in the winter is a heavy wet snow.Even this would only be a problem if you were not aware of what was going on.As long as you keep the snow from building up on the tent there won't be a problem.Most three season tents have a one piece fly that goes over the part that is ventilated.On one of mine the fly doesn'treach the ground,so I've got to bank a little snow around it.We will be camping in the trees and its quite protected from the wind.

Hiram just make sure the netting is in good shape so the "skeeters" won't get ya.

Foxgloves
02-06-2007, 11:56 AM
One thing I do to keep warm, is take Nalgene bottles to bed with me that have been filled with boiling water. Make sure the lid is on tight and put them in a sock. In the morning, you have water that will boil quickly because it's still warm and you can brush your teeth right away because the water has been sanitized. Then, when everyone is wondering how you got your coffee and oatmeal so quick, you can putter around the campsite.

Thats a great idea...never heard of that technique although I can't say I"ve done alot of winter camping with below freezing temps.

What do people use for backpacking stoves? Anyone else use the
Jetboil system? I think its awesome!

pjpreb
02-06-2007, 02:43 PM
Boiling water won't crack a Nalgene bottle? $8 mistake if it does.

Hiram357
02-06-2007, 03:51 PM
I have one four season tent and a couple of three season tents.I've used both for winter camping.The only problem you might normally incounter using a three season tent in the winter is a heavy wet snow.Even this would only be a problem if you were not aware of what was going on.As long as you keep the snow from building up on the tent there won't be a problem.Most three season tents have a one piece fly that goes over the part that is ventilated.On one of mine the fly doesn'treach the ground,so I've got to bank a little snow around it.We will be camping in the trees and its quite protected from the wind.

Hiram just make sure the netting is in good shape so the "skeeters" won't get ya.

ya know, last year at this time i actually did see a skeeter at the snow bowl....

Is that the only diff between 3 and 4 season tents is that the 4s dont have any open vents?

Team2hunt
02-06-2007, 07:33 PM
Thats a great idea...never heard of that technique although I can't say I"ve done alot of winter camping with below freezing temps.

What do people use for backpacking stoves? Anyone else use the
Jetboil system? I think its awesome!

This was my first time out in below zero weather. :eek: It was beautiful to wake in the am and see a million crystals all over the inside of your tent. My 3 season tent was just fine, even if I was in a 20 degree bag. I had an issue with my toes getting cold in the middle of the night. Hot Hands in my socks did the trick. We tend to splurge on food if we can sled or kayak it in. We have been using a Coleman single fired propane burner. Large enough to cook ribs or a nice stew. Mmmmmm. I'm not sure that will fit in a Jetboil. :rolleyes:

Kaching Karen
02-06-2007, 10:03 PM
I've been doing the boiling water in Nalgene bottles trick for years. I've never had one split, break, or leak... and I tell you, I toss and turn at night.

Bring plastic bags with you. You can use them as vapor barriers on your feet and just slip them over your socks (some people can stand the plastic dirrectly on their feet) and put on a loose fitting pair of socks over that. Can make for toasie toes at night.

vicbiker
02-07-2007, 11:44 PM
I think if you are camping on relatively flat terrain a sled works better then a back pack.Its hard to hike very far or to work very hard with a pack without working up a sweat which will leave your back soaking wet.This means when you get to the camp site you'll need to change clothes or dry the ones you're wearing.With a sled as long as you don't over excert yourself you can stay nice and dry.Dry means warm.

Hiking up a mt. requires the use of a pack and try as I might I've never been able to do it with out getting sweaty.So I always bring an extra hot chilly top to change into.The wet one can be dried quickly hanging on a branch in the wind.The great thing about poly-pro.

Medawisla
01-28-2008, 07:31 PM
My tip is long underwear!!!! :p:cool:
Without that little, thin, dry layer right next to my skin, the breeze would get to me! Ask Hiram, I'm cranky without long underwear!:rolleyes:

dí76
01-28-2008, 07:56 PM
My tip is long underwear!!!! :p:cool:
Without that little, thin, dry layer right next to my skin, the breeze would get to me! Ask Hiram, I'm cranky without long underwear!:rolleyes:

ooooooohhhhhhh, do you talk like that to Hiram.... :D:D:D

Medawisla
01-28-2008, 08:51 PM
ooooooohhhhhhh, do you talk like that to Hiram.... :D:D:D

maybe but i usually don't share those little whisperings...:o

Hiram357
01-28-2008, 10:39 PM
ooooooohhhhhhh, do you talk like that to Hiram.... :D:D:D

yeah... I've gotta breeze that'll get to her... I had taco bell for lunch!! :cool:

Medawisla
01-28-2008, 10:42 PM
yeah... I've gotta breeze that'll get to her... I had taco bell for lunch!! :cool:

I heard the initial air passing when I called him this afternoon come from the front end, now he's in the bathroom sharing the air of the back end...:p

Mainiac1957
01-29-2008, 07:15 AM
I heard the initial air passing when I called him this afternoon come from the front end, now he's in the bathroom sharing the air of the back end...:p

All this medical jargon is making my head swim. I'll have to get a medical dictionary:rolleyes:

Medawisla
01-29-2008, 07:37 AM
Always have an extra set of gloves/mittens. They often get wet, especially setting up camp in the snow, so you'll want another set while the first set dry. :cool:

Mainiac1957
01-29-2008, 07:42 AM
Lots of extra socks so when your feet sweat you can change them.;) And food, so when you eat it you will have more to eat.:D

Medawisla
01-29-2008, 07:41 PM
Lots of extra socks so when your feet sweat you can change them.;) And food, so when you eat it you will have more to eat.:D

I'm definately a fan of dry socks!!

Today's Tip: put your clothes for the next day in your sleeping bag to wake up to them being warm :cool: Although Hiram prefers not to change at all! :eek::rolleyes:

tat
01-29-2008, 08:55 PM
Put your tent on top of the snow. It's easier on the ground if you camp on the snow rather than on the ground.

Leave no trace!

Kaching Karen
01-29-2008, 09:54 PM
A warm sleeping bag is really nice, but you want to make sure that the space between you and the ground is well insulated. I take two foam pads with me and sometimes will put a blanket under me on top of that. Air mattresses are not a good thing....

Hiram357
01-29-2008, 10:00 PM
A warm sleeping bag is really nice, but you want to make sure that the space between you and the ground is well insulated. I take two foam pads with me and sometimes will put a blanket under me on top of that. Air mattresses are not a good thing....

but those self inflating foamy ones have some pretty good insulation :D

Kaching Karen
01-29-2008, 10:12 PM
More air than foam... not good. I use an air mattress in the summer that is super light weight, but I have to put about 30 puffs of air in it to blow it up. Now, that's an air mattress.

I use a self-inflatting foam mattress in the winter. It's a therma-rest.

dí76
01-29-2008, 10:21 PM
I like the under armor thong to keep things warm:D

http://www.uspatriotstore.com/ProductInfo.aspx?productid=1966

Paste the link and they will look:D

Hiram357
01-29-2008, 10:35 PM
I like the under armor thong to keep things warm:D

http://www.uspatriotstore.com/ProductInfo.aspx?productid=1966

Paste the link and they will look:D


oww... I think I hurt my head when my eyes rolled back too far after seeing this one... :rolleyes:

Kaching Karen
01-30-2008, 06:15 AM
Hey Dave, I thought you were going to model that thong!

dí76
01-30-2008, 08:04 AM
Hey Dave, I thought you were going to model that thong!


I can, but if you picture a beached hairy shamoo wearing a peice of dental floss that would be pretty close. I was wearing it at you event... You didnt see it while I was wearing my low rise jeans and bent over to tie my boots.:D:p

Sorry, back on topic.

Hiram357
01-30-2008, 08:06 AM
Hey Dave, I thought you were going to model that thong!

Dave, if you model that, they will never find your body.... :p

dubord207
01-30-2008, 05:55 PM
Dave, if you model that, they will never find your body.... :p
I don't know about you Dave, but it takes a special "build" to wear those things. I don't have it. When I die my body is being donated to science fiction!:D:D

Medawisla
01-31-2008, 07:43 AM
On to more practicable advice:

Pack early. I find the earlier ahead Hiram and I pack, the least amount of stuff we forget. :p

Hiram357
02-24-2008, 11:15 PM
Ok, this isn't really a camping "tip" more of a question... I found this website(http://www.mrefoods.com/ and http://www.campingsurvival.com/mreskits.html), that sells the military grade MREs... It seems like a novel idea if you're doin some backpacking (or in sledding...) was wonderin if anyone has ever had any first hand experience with them...??? :confused::confused::confused:

attroll
02-25-2008, 12:54 AM
Ok, this isn't really a camping "tip" more of a question... I found this website, that sells the military grade MREs... It seems like a novel idea if you're doin some backpacking (or in sledding...) was wonderin if anyone has ever had any first hand experience with them...??? :confused::confused::confused:
We can not answer unless you tell use the web site you are referring to :).

Haffy
02-25-2008, 06:14 PM
Yeah where is the "linky" ?

Hiram357
02-25-2008, 06:42 PM
I don't know what you guys are talking about... the links are up there in my post and have been since i forgo... i mean uhh... put them in when i first wrote the post... :rolleyes:;)

Hiram357
02-25-2008, 06:44 PM
but just a simple update, we are currently tryin the mountain house brand stuff that i bought at dick's... its not too bad, boil water and add to the pouch... even stef can cook this stuff! :D


i guess ya have to add the water boiliing because the food was freeze dried, so it takes really hot water to thaw it out... :rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:;):D

Medawisla
02-26-2008, 07:38 PM
but just a simple update, we are currently tryin the mountain house brand stuff that i bought at dick's... its not too bad, boil water and add to the pouch... even stef can cook this stuff! :D


i guess ya have to add the water boiliing because the food was freeze dried, so it takes really hot water to thaw it out... :rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:;):D

It's pretty good stuff! Although we tried the non-meat stuff, we'll see how the meat stuff tastes, but the strawberries will be great in oatmeal (that was Hiram's idea too). Can't wait for the weekend, and we're going to have new snow!!! :D:D:D

hollora
03-03-2008, 12:54 PM
Well - all you brave souls - how did it go? The snow was beautiful looking out the window. Hope you all had a good time.

Hiram357
03-03-2008, 04:13 PM
Well - all you brave souls - how did it go? The snow was beautiful looking out the window. Hope you all had a good time.

It was even more beautiful sleepin in it! :D

as always vic and tom went out of their way to make a great campout. the poker run was tons of fun (we were tryin to find the caches without a broken trail) and the shelter and firepit were nicer than any hotel i've ever stayed in (especially went the temps hit -15, we really liked the firepit then) :D

hollora
03-03-2008, 04:41 PM
Ah, yes - I know Tom really went all out for Warren Island, too (a most memorial one for me of '07) ~ and I bet Vic can do it too. I will never forget the twinkle in Vic's eyes when Becket and I were going for one of this caches and he showed up. The two of them (Tom + Vic) = quite the pair.

Well, to miss a poker run was ok - as I stink at cards (cribbage might be the rare exception). Firepits I love........ Just to old to venture on this one with my back.

That's what makes Geocaching so great, there is something for everyone and we all share together when we can. I have enjoyed the summer camp outs and hope to do more this year.

Hey, anyone take some photos I can use on my talk at the Orrington Library in April? Shoot them to me at my email addy - I sure will give you credit for being of the stout hearted!

Medawisla
03-03-2008, 08:29 PM
Ah, yes - I know Tom really went all out for Warren Island, too (a most memorial one for me of '07) ~ and I bet Vic can do it too. I will never forget the twinkle in Vic's eyes when Becket and I were going for one of this caches and he showed up. The two of them (Tom + Vic) = quite the pair.

Well, to miss a poker run was ok - as I stink at cards (cribbage might be the rare exception). Firepits I love........ Just to old to venture on this one with my back.

That's what makes Geocaching so great, there is something for everyone and we all share together when we can. I have enjoyed the summer camp outs and hope to do more this year.

Hey, anyone take some photos I can use on my talk at the Orrington Library in April? Shoot them to me at my email addy - I sure will give you credit for being of the stout hearted!

I'll try to add photos tonight...I don't have your email though...PM me :)

tat
03-03-2008, 08:59 PM
There are a lot of pics on the event page.

Medawisla
03-03-2008, 09:03 PM
I'll try to add photos tonight...I don't have your email though...PM me :)

Sorry, can't get the pics uploaded...can't find the camera cord:(...maybe i'll be a little less lazy in searching tomorrow...:p

Haffy
03-03-2008, 09:38 PM
Man get yourself a card reader,so much easier....

Medawisla
03-03-2008, 09:50 PM
Man get yourself a card reader,so much easier....

seriously! i'd love to, that and motivation to print and organize pics...:p

hollora
03-03-2008, 11:24 PM
There are a lot of pics on the event page.
thanks TAT - will check it out. Glad you all had a good time!

attroll
03-04-2008, 01:38 AM
There are a lot of pics on the event page.
It would also be nice if people could post there photos on our web site so that others visiting this web site can see how we all get along and play well together. It just might encourages others to join our web site and our community here.

Medawisla
03-04-2008, 07:39 AM
It would also be nice if people could post there photos on our web site so that others visiting this web site can see how we all get along and play well together. It just might encourages others to join our web site and our community here.

I agree.:)
This morning I found out I have a card reader on my new lap top. Do you think it'd be the right size?? No!:mad: That'd make life to easy:p...So I'll try to find the camera cord tonight.

hollora
03-12-2008, 08:01 PM
Attroll - I, too, am probably guilty of putting photos on the cache page and not here. Usually I post them as I am logging the event and never go back to put them on here. I will try to get better at doing them here too. Thanks for the reminder.