View Full Version : RE: Outdoor wood boilers



firefighterjake
06-18-2008, 12:28 PM
Anyone have any experience with outdoor wood boilers . . . good, bad, indifferent?

Sudonim
06-18-2008, 01:11 PM
I know that every time I drive by them, I'm glad they aren't next door!
I don't know if they make clean burning ones, but I've seen plenty that don't.

Hiram357
06-18-2008, 01:23 PM
the ones that you see burning nastily are the ones where people chuck in the waterlogged wood with moss still growin on em... I know of some people that burn seasoned dry wood in there's and you wouldn't even know they were next door.

TRF
06-18-2008, 01:35 PM
Anyone have any experience with outdoor wood boilers . . . good, bad, indifferent?

The biggest complaint I've heard is that they take lots of wood. On the pro side, they will burn anything, from tires to water soaked clothes. The cost seems to be prohibitive, lots of initial outlay for a heating system that has no longer a life than a wood stove or an oil burner.

Hiram357
06-18-2008, 01:40 PM
On the pro side, they will burn anything, from tires to water soaked clothes. heh... hence the reason why most people complain about them.... :rolleyes:

vicbiker
06-18-2008, 05:36 PM
The worst thing about outside wood boilers is getting the wife to put wood in them.:rolleyes: If you are going to have to be the one putting in the wood, then by all means get in inside boiler.:D

Sudonim
06-18-2008, 06:10 PM
I've been looking really hard at pellet stoves. If I use the same amount of oil at work as last year, at the current pellet prices, the fuel cost would be exactly 1/3 of oil! Problem...the commercial sized pellet stoves won't be in stock until around Dec/Jan.
We are also getting one for the house, that's available this summer. If you are military, you can get a 10% off hardwood pellets at Home Depot or Lowe's, about $205 per ton.

Opalsns
06-18-2008, 06:34 PM
We only have wood stove for heating the house in the winter.When the oil prices went up during Katrina, so did the price of wood. Price gouging happens because people are greedy and take advantage of situations. Luckly we have 15 acres to harvest from and a friend that delivers tree length to us for 105.00 a cord. Believe it or not, Those pellets and stoves are going to get price gouged too!!! If I were you, I'd get a couple of palets of those pellets way before winter.Oh and if the electricity goes out and you don't have a generator, Those pellet stoves are Useless!!!!
Opalsns

kayakerinme
06-18-2008, 10:29 PM
the commercial sized pellet stoves won't be in stock until around Dec/Jan.
Are commercial sized pellets produced by commercial sized bunnies? How are you going to keep all those rabbits anyway - commercial or regualr sized? :p

attroll
06-19-2008, 12:17 AM
I've been looking really hard at pellet stoves. If I use the same amount of oil at work as last year, at the current pellet prices, the fuel cost would be exactly 1/3 of oil! Problem...the commercial sized pellet stoves won't be in stock until around Dec/Jan.
We are also getting one for the house, that's available this summer. If you are military, you can get a 10% off hardwood pellets at Home Depot or Lowe's, about $205 per ton.
I was thinking of switching from wood stove to pellets stove but then I talk to one of the guys I work with that got a pellet stove last year. He told me how many tons he burned and how much he spent. I can not remember the amount he bought but he said he spent a little over $1,000 in pellets to heat his house last winter.

After hearing that I decided to stay with my wood stove. I spent less then $400 to heat my house last year.

Sudonim
06-19-2008, 07:47 AM
I know that wood is cheaper (especially if you have your own woodlot) but the thing I like about pellets is that I can run the stove 24-7 and don't have to be there when it's on. They have an auto ignitor and turn on and off with a thermostat, just like an oil furnace. The pellet price per BTU isn't much more than wood as it's very dry and has a lot of heat energy. Having said that, there's nothing like curling up in front of a nice roaring fire in the dead of winter!

TRF
06-19-2008, 08:42 AM
Pellet production will not meet supply this year with current predictions. As mill prices go up, firewood prices will too. Mill prices for hardwood are the highest they have ever been. A load of "mill" wood brings more money with less headaches than a load of "firewood." Trust me when I say less headache, for those that drive wheelers imagine some of the places people want their firewood placed versus driving up to a crane and having your wood offloaded for you. Also, as the mills look toward bio-mass to generate their own electricity, the prices will increase even more. I'm not off topic here; Pellets are made of all wood products, like branches, softwood and hardwood and that material is compressed under high pressure with an adhesive so BTU wise their is negligible difference between "hardwood" pellet or "softwood" pellet. Because pellets are made out of "the whole tree" eventually the price will settle/stabilize and be lower than "round" firewood BUT this may be several years in stabilizing as mill capacity in the state is minimal at best. Therefore, between high demand for the pellet stoves (which are currently getting premium prices because of the demand) and low supply of locally made pellets (which are also at a premium price because low supply/transportation from out-of-state) I would look at a pellet stove as a sort of "market speculation." I don't think they are a good "deal" yet but in 4 or 5 years they may be one of the few inexpensive options.

My understanding is they work great! I am "market speculating" My firewood is essentially free but pellets look like a clean and economical option for the future

balinda
06-19-2008, 10:21 AM
We just got our Harmon top loading pellet stove installed. We bought 3 tons of pellets and they are sitting in the garage. If the price of oil goes up to over $5 a gallon we may pay this off in one season. :)

firefighterjake
06-19-2008, 12:04 PM
Anyone have any experience with heat pumps?

Sudonim
06-19-2008, 12:35 PM
Anyone have any experience with heat pumps?

There was an editorial letter in todays BDN that covered heat pumps. Looks like quite low cost/BTU, but not sure how much installation is or if the technology is "quite there" yet. I talked to someone at the Bangor Home Show in April about them, they are intriguing.

firefighterjake
06-19-2008, 02:04 PM
There was an editorial letter in todays BDN that covered heat pumps. Looks like quite low cost/BTU, but not sure how much installation is or if the technology is "quite there" yet. I talked to someone at the Bangor Home Show in April about them, they are intriguing.

That letter is what got me thinking . . . and like you I too thought that they might not be "quite there" for having working heat pumps in this climate.

Hiram357
06-19-2008, 02:41 PM
That letter is what got me thinking . . . and like you I too thought that they might not be "quite there" for having working heat pumps in this climate.

Jake, on my experince... don't go with a heat pump... in the seasonal temps, it will work fine, but when it gets down to being cold, you'll be running off of secondary heat 90% of the time...

firefighterjake
06-19-2008, 03:59 PM
Jake, on my experince... don't go with a heat pump... in the seasonal temps, it will work fine, but when it gets down to being cold, you'll be running off of secondary heat 90% of the time...

Well you're the HVAC expert . . . so I will cease exploring this option for alternative heating.

brdad
06-19-2008, 04:43 PM
I would assume your fire insurance rates would go down if you switched from indoor wood or pellet burning stoves to an outside boiler, And go up if you install secondary wood or pellet stoves.

Neither Lee or I are fans of wood or pellets, but we are going to install an electric water heater in the next few weeks since it'll cost less than a quarter of the cost (during the non-heating season) to run that compared to oil.

pjpreb
06-19-2008, 05:40 PM
We are considering another propane space heater. Some models will continue to operate if the electricity goes out and there is no ash to dispose of. I think the price of LP falls somewhere between pellets and oil but nobody has to feed/clean the propane stove. Turn it on with a remote?? That's for me! :D;)

Sudonim
06-19-2008, 06:45 PM
I wish someone would invent a mosquito burning stove! The biomass in Maine could fuel New England, no problem ;)

Wouldn't want to have to collect a 40lb bag though....

brdad
06-19-2008, 06:55 PM
I wish someone would invent a mosquito burning stove! The biomass in Maine could fuel New England, no problem ;)

Wouldn't want to have to collect a 40lb bag though....

Did you hear about the insects scientists have discovered which, when fed a diet of wood waste, sugar cane, or other certain materials, produce crude oil?

Sudonim
06-19-2008, 07:07 PM
Did you hear about the insects scientists have discovered which, when fed a diet of wood waste, sugar cane, or other certain materials, produce crude oil?

No, but I had heard that if you take a kazillion dinosaurs and put them under lots of heat and pressure you can make oil.
Or maybe it was two kazillion...

whetstone mayor
06-19-2008, 07:14 PM
Take a look see at todays' editorial page of the BDN. Calvin Luther has a good article of the BTU content of the different fuels and a paragraph or two on heat pumps. I think it is pretty factual.

vicbiker
06-19-2008, 07:30 PM
Last year we made the decision to not burn wood in the house anymore. Put the stove in the basement for burning all our burnable waste. No more wood mess in the house, no more cutting, splitting, lugging and cleaning out the ashes. Decided we could afford the oil. Well that was last year! I just came back from scrounging a load of fire wood out of the woods. The stove will be coming back upstairs. What was I thinking? As said before in this forum, if you are going to burn wood, it has to be free wood to save any money. At two hundred plus a cord for wood, plus all the work involved, there is no savings burning wood.

attroll
06-20-2008, 01:09 AM
A heat pump is actually an air conditioner in all reality. All it does and reverse the condenser and evaporator flow. We had one when I was stationed in Maryland in the military and it worked fine but then again we did not get much snow down there either.

As Andy said about pellet stoves it is nice to be able to load them and set the thermostat and leave for the day know you do not have to stock the wood stove all day. It is cleaner burning but does not put out the same kind of heat a wood stove does. I can heat my house from a dead cold to really warm with my wood stove in about 20 minutes. Your not going to be able to do that with a pellet stove. Another thing to consider is if you lose electricity then you can not use your pellet stove unless you have a backup generator. There are pros and cons to both a wood stove and a pellet stove. I would love to have a pellet stove but I would have to hear more good stuff about them. My neighbor hates his. My friend at work loves his but he spent over $1,000 in pellets last year to heat his house. I spent under $400 for cut split and delivered fire wood to heat my house last year. This is a savings of $600 over a pellet stove. So far the wood stove still wins. Another thing I do expect in the future after everyone starts on the pellet stove wagon. I think the price of pellets will go up a lot because they are going to have everyone right where they want them.

Don't get me wrong. I am not against pellet stoves. So far from what I have heard I would spend less on my wood stove then I would on a pellet stove to heat the house. I can list a lot of things I hate about my wood stove and there are a lot but price wise I will stick with the wood stove for at least one more year.

firefighterjake
06-20-2008, 07:05 AM
Last year we made the decision to not burn wood in the house anymore. Put the stove in the basement for burning all our burnable waste. No more wood mess in the house, no more cutting, splitting, lugging and cleaning out the ashes. Decided we could afford the oil. Well that was last year! I just came back from scrounging a load of fire wood out of the woods. The stove will be coming back upstairs. What was I thinking? As said before in this forum, if you are going to burn wood, it has to be free wood to save any money. At two hundred plus a cord for wood, plus all the work involved, there is no savings burning wood.

There's no such thing as "free" wood in my own opinion . . . unless someone has (because they're just so darn nice) cut, chopped up and delivered the wood to your house for free since even "free" wood in a woodlot will cost you something in terms of gas/oil to cut it up, split it and haul it to your home . . . that said I do have a woodlot and am leaning towards wood since the small investment of gas/oil I think would be far less than $4.50/gallon for oil. I am also considering an outdoor wood boiler rather than a woodstove or pellet stove due to space issues inside the house (and the lack of a real cellar . . . more of a crawl space with a rock floor.)

firefighterjake
06-20-2008, 07:13 AM
I have actually looked at a pellet stove, but as mentioned earlier space issue is such that I am now giving more thought to a wood boiler . . . either an outdoor unit or an indoor boiler that I can build a small shed around and connect to the home's existing oil boiler. The other reason I am shying away from a pellet stove is that I would like the ability to heat the entire home with an equal amount of heat.

That said, I know the Fire Inspectors here in town really like the pellet stoves . . . in fact they like them so much that one replaced his propane space heater (a Waterford propane stove which is quite attractive) with a Harman pellet stove and the other Inspector also bought a pellet stove along with a domestic hot water solar heating system. The Inspectors like them from the safety standpoint, ease of installation, cleanliness of the pellets vs. wood, convenience of dumping the pellets into a hopper, thermostat system, etc.

Pellets really seem to have a lot going for them right now . . . but as one Inspector pointed out you really need to do some research since all pellet stoves are not created equal . . . one stove he inspected he found to be so unsafe (made in China with a German-sounding name) that he took the highly unusual step of reporting it to the Consumer Products Safety Commission. If anyone does go this route I would also recommend talking to various owners who have used their pellet stoves and find out what they like and dislike about their stoves . . . apparently some stoves burn very clean and the ash clean up is very easy while other models tend to produce much more ash and/or clean up can be quite the task.

Opalsns
06-20-2008, 09:56 AM
There's no such thing as "free" wood in my own opinion . . . unless someone has (because they're just so darn nice) cut, chopped up and delivered the wood to your house for free since even "free" wood in a woodlot will cost you something in terms of gas/oil to cut it up, split it and haul it to your home . . .


Don't Forget Taxes!:eek::confused::(:mad:

TRF
06-20-2008, 10:02 AM
There's no such thing as "free" wood in my own opinion . . . unless someone has (because they're just so darn nice) cut, chopped up and delivered the wood to your house for free since even "free" wood in a woodlot will cost you something in terms of gas/oil to cut it up, split it and haul it to your home . . . that said I do have a woodlot and am leaning towards wood since the small investment of gas/oil I think would be far less than $4.50/gallon for oil. I am also considering an outdoor wood boiler rather than a woodstove or pellet stove due to space issues inside the house (and the lack of a real cellar . . . more of a crawl space with a rock floor.)


The actual cost of the wood could be free. The labor involved getting it prepped for the stove and the actual use of the wood might cost dearly in physical labor and cash. Let's face it, the grass on my lawn is free but I pay to mow it. Taxes are for the land, with or without trees; with or without lawn.

I have always heated my home(s) with wood as a primary source. We have the fortunate circumstance to have 1000's of acres of wood lots. Many folks who harvest the wood for us and all the equipment necessary to get the wood to where we need it. This part of the wood is costly, no question about it but over all, my labor included, it's still the cheapest source I've found to heat our home.

I recently looked into a Whisper wind power generator . For 14K a company in Augusta would set it up and hook it into the power grid. It produces something like 600 Kilowatts or about half of our electrical consumption. (We could reduce this dramatically with some conscious effort.) There are low cost loans to help and a federal tax credit. Heaven forbide the Maine gov't would help by offering a tax credit. These systems have the inverter in the head of the generator meaning no batteries or needed changes to the current meter box or house wiring. These systems will turn your meter backwards if you are using less electricity than you produce. Plus they can be cascaded meaning I could put up 2 and connect them together to produce all my electricity. They predict that it would be about a 10 year financial recovery if the price of electricity doesn't go up dramatically. For those considering new heating systems, electric heat wouldn't be so bad if you were generating your own electricity. Just another thing to consider!!

brdad
06-20-2008, 11:43 AM
FFJ, (or anyone else interested for that matter) if you go with the indoor boiler in a shed, I have two used wood boilers. One is a tiny commercial unit (Buderus, perhaps - I forget) which the outer jacket has been beat up some and it has set outside. It would probably take a few parts to get it back to new, but the price would be right. The other is a larger one in nearly perfect shape made from a small company (in New England IIRC). Less bells and whistles, but has a decent sized firebox and is currently plumbed in and puts out good heat. Both can be attached to an automatic damper, which gives some regulation.

firefighterjake
06-20-2008, 12:22 PM
FFJ, (or anyone else interested for that matter) if you go with the indoor boiler in a shed, I have two used wood boilers. One is a tiny commercial unit (Buderus, perhaps - I forget) which the outer jacket has been beat up some and it has set outside. It would probably take a few parts to get it back to new, but the price would be right. The other is a larger one in nearly perfect shape made from a small company (in New England IIRC). Less bells and whistles, but has a decent sized firebox and is currently plumbed in and puts out good heat. Both can be attached to an automatic damper, which gives some regulation.

I'm intrigued and would love to know more info . . . i.e. BTU output, if one or both can be plumbed into conventional baseboard heat oil boiler systems, your experience with them, etc. Feel free to PM me.

brdad
06-20-2008, 01:08 PM
I'm intrigued and would love to know more info . . . i.e. BTU output, if one or both can be plumbed into conventional baseboard heat oil boiler systems, your experience with them, etc. Feel free to PM me.

Any system should be able to be plumbed into an existing conventional hydronic system. Give me a couple days and I will take a ride to Clifton where they are and see what kind of BTU & capacity numbers I can find for you.

firefighterjake
06-21-2008, 09:10 AM
Any system should be able to be plumbed into an existing conventional hydronic system. Give me a couple days and I will take a ride to Clifton where they are and see what kind of BTU & capacity numbers I can find for you.

That would be great . . . I am definitely interested in learning more.

darterkitfox
06-21-2008, 06:58 PM
are these boilers designed to heat swimming pool water?

brdad
06-21-2008, 07:29 PM
are these boilers designed to heat swimming pool water?

Properly plumbed, you can use any boiler to heat or help heat swimming pool water. In fact, it is not uncommon when you have a wood boiler that there is an excess amount of hot water which can be "dumped" into a large load such as a swimming pool, large radiators or storage tank in the basement, or driveway heaters.

In most of these cases, you would want to use a heat exchanger, which isolates the boiler water from the dump load. There are wood fired boilers designed to directly heat pools without a heat exchanger, which probably work great for that purpose since they plumb directly into the circulator line with PVC, but they are not designed to heat your house as well.

kayaking loon
06-22-2008, 10:09 AM
We're interested in alternative heat too. In Boothbay Harbor, during one or another oil crisis, we installed a Dumont wood furnace, designed by Professor Hill at UMO. We burned about 8 cords a year, some from our own 21 acre woodlot right across the street from our house, some we bought tree length. That system heated all the domestic hot water too. Fun to tell people on a 90 degree day that you have to go home and fire up the furnace.:p It worked well, but eventually we got old or at least older, oil got cheaper, and we went back to oil.

Now fast forward to life in Eustis. We own about an acre of land. Of course, Plum Creek's land starts a few feet from our house and runs for hundreds of miles, but they haven't invited us to cut any. We now have a patchwork of heating systems. The "camp" part, that we built first, has a Monitor kerosene heater which heats great and costs not too much to run, even now. We also have a Jotul propane stove in case the power goes out. That runs and heats well with no power, it's just that the fan doesn't work then. But that's just backup heat, we never used it at all last winter.

Then we sold out in BBH and added on to the camp. That part has an oil furnace which also heats domestic hot water. That cost us BIG money last winter.:( And we also have a propane fireplace at the far end and one strip of electric heat in husband's den which almost never gets used. And small electric heaters in both bathrooms, because who wants a cold bathroom. And nobody wants to heat the whole house to get just a warm bathroom. So we now have a patchwork heating system, as you can see. We're considering going to a propane heater for just the domestic hot water, that way we could turn off the furnace probably six months of the year, even here, by spot heating with the other systems. And we're considering a pellet stove some other year, depending on how they go. A friend just bought one, plans to heat his whole house with it. He bought 6 1/2 tons of pellets. One ton fits on a 4x4' pallet. He will need to fill the hopper every 10 hours. So that precludes going away for a vacation, doesn't it? You can buy battery backup for the pellet stoves, so they run when the power is out. I'm also interested in windpower etc. but the start up costs are really high. Keep talking, we're listening.

And I understand that a lot of towns are banning outside wood burners. They have low smoke stacks and pollute the neighborhood air. A high stack is better, but pollution is pollution just the same, isn't it?:eek:

WhereRWe?
06-22-2008, 05:40 PM
I'm also interested in windpower etc. but the start up costs are really high.

If we were a lot younger, we'd install a residential wind generator in a heartbeat. The cost payback is only 8-10 years, and after that you can even make money selling your excess to CMP.

I've looked at this system (http://www.skystreamenergy.com/skystream/) many times...

attroll
06-22-2008, 11:30 PM
If we were a lot younger, we'd install a residential wind generator in a heartbeat. The cost payback is only 8-10 years, and after that you can even make money selling your excess to CMP.

I've looked at this system (http://www.skystreamenergy.com/skystream/) many times...
That is my exact thought too. I am to old to install a residential wind generator now. It would probably pay for itself where I am in a years time but it is to chancy. I want to be pretty much debt free by the year 2010 and so far I am on track.

TRF
06-23-2008, 09:46 AM
That is my exact thought too. I am to old to install a residential wind generator now. It would probably pay for itself where I am in a years time but it is to chancy. I want to be pretty much debt free by the year 2010 and so far I am on track.


I agree Rick! BUT if I were to build a new home some of the things that would be included in the construction cost would be Wind power generator and residential home sprinklers as well as a a black metal roof with water piping underneath for solar assisted heated water and a few other things I can think of. Central fire alarm system....We are considering doing just that when our children leave home. I've a few years before that will happen but the Whisper and the Skystream wind generators are an interesting prospect......We still may install the wind generators here,,,we are watching the P.U.C as the are talking dramatic increases in electical cost. Although, the state legislature is considering a proposal for home heating assistence for all Mainers....Lets hope.

firefighterjake
06-23-2008, 03:20 PM
Properly plumbed, you can use any boiler to heat or help heat swimming pool water. In fact, it is not uncommon when you have a wood boiler that there is an excess amount of hot water which can be "dumped" into a large load such as a swimming pool, large radiators or storage tank in the basement, or driveway heaters.

In most of these cases, you would want to use a heat exchanger, which isolates the boiler water from the dump load. There are wood fired boilers designed to directly heat pools without a heat exchanger, which probably work great for that purpose since they plumb directly into the circulator line with PVC, but they are not designed to heat your house as well.

Hmm . . . another aspect that would be intriguing for me. We have a pool, but swimming can be limited in the Spring/Fall or even in the Summer after a few days of weather like we had last week and the temps just aren't quite warm enough to go swimming. If I could get a boiler plumbed for heat in the winter and possibly to heat up the pool just a tad in the shoulder swimming months. . . . intriguing . . . very intriguing.

I'm also thinking that having any excess heat either dump into a heater in my garage (currently uninsulated though) or in a storage container in the crawl space (fully enclosed . . . just a bit tight on space unless you're four feet tall) might work out as well.

I assume there must be a way to plumb such a system so that in the winter the wood fired boiler could heat the house and excess heat would dump into the aforementioned garage or a storage container in the crawl space and not dump into the pool . . . and then in the fall/spring the excess heat could be dumped into the pool rather than the garage/crawl space????

TRF
06-23-2008, 03:42 PM
Hmm . . . another aspect that would be intriguing for me. We have a pool, but swimming can be limited in the Spring/Fall or even in the Summer after a few days of weather like we had last week and the temps just aren't quite warm enough to go swimming. If I could get a boiler plumbed for heat in the winter and possibly to heat up the pool just a tad in the shoulder swimming months. . . . intriguing . . . very intriguing.

I'm also thinking that having any excess heat either dump into a heater in my garage (currently uninsulated though) or in a storage container in the crawl space (fully enclosed . . . just a bit tight on space unless you're four feet tall) might work out as well.

I assume there must be a way to plumb such a system so that in the winter the wood fired boiler could heat the house and excess heat would dump into the aforementioned garage or a storage container in the crawl space and not dump into the pool . . . and then in the fall/spring the excess heat could be dumped into the pool rather than the garage/crawl space????

Where there is a will, there is a way. just plumb in a loop off one of your circulators on the furnace with a valve that lets water go to the pool when "opened" or if "closed" goes to the zone it was originally intended to heat. (We had an inground pool, after several years of evaluating the cost we realized it would be cheaper to buy a small island in the Pacific than to keep the pool open therefore we had it filled in several years ago.) Before I filled it in I plumbed it in with PVC (I'm sure it wasn't "proper") and it worked well. We could get easily get the temp up to 90 degree as long as we kept the solar cover on it to help insulate. We swam in it all the way into September. Now we go swimming in February and January, usually in the Carribean..:)

It can be and is often done!!

brdad
06-23-2008, 05:25 PM
Here is a pdf with a small bit of information on dump loads. Not sure why, but it seems a bit slow to navigate through for only a 2.5 MB file. But it might give you an idea.

http://www.cmxshow.com/docs/CMX_CIPHEX-wood_solar.pdf

And TRF is correct, a little valving, or an extra circulator and a switch, you can direct the heat in the direction you want.

Sudonim
06-23-2008, 05:25 PM
Now we go swimming in February and January, usually in the Carribean..:)


How much PVC pipe do you need to plumb all the way to the Carribean!?!?:eek:

TRF
06-23-2008, 05:35 PM
How much PVC pipe do you need to plumb all the way to the Carribean!?!?:eek:

If I were a licensed plumber, probably not too much :D:D:D:D:D

Hiram357
06-23-2008, 05:52 PM
How much PVC pipe do you need to plumb all the way to the Carribean!?!?:eek:

you can do it with a 20' piece as long as you have a good pipe stretcher, I know a guy that sells em cheap, he's also got some decent skyhooks too.... :rolleyes:

darterkitfox
06-23-2008, 08:35 PM
Firefighter, we completely enclosed our pool last year and besides keeping it absolutely clean with a lot less chemical use, my wife swam into the first week of November. I don't swim in water under 84 degrees though. Last year the water got up to 96 degrees. The downside for some people is that the interior air temperature gets to be 120 degrees in the sunshine. I like it, but most people don't. That's why I was asking about the wood boiler heating it. We could swim in April and November with a little wood. If you want to see a picture, email me at stepcars@exploremaine.com and after 20 hours of upload time, I can send it to you.

hide_from_the_kids
06-23-2008, 08:49 PM
you can do it with a 20' piece as long as you have a good pipe stretcher, I know a guy that sells em cheap, he's also got some decent skyhooks too.... :rolleyes:
IS THAT A LEFTHANDED STRETCHER?

firefighterjake
06-24-2008, 07:54 AM
Here is a pdf with a small bit of information on dump loads. Not sure why, but it seems a bit slow to navigate through for only a 2.5 MB file. But it might give you an idea.

http://www.cmxshow.com/docs/CMX_CIPHEX-wood_solar.pdf

And TRF is correct, a little valving, or an extra circulator and a switch, you can direct the heat in the direction you want.

Very interesting reading . . . thank you.