View Full Version : Staff or poles



Team V3
06-10-2009, 03:33 PM
Hey. I was wondering how many of you out there use a staff or hiking poles when you are in the trails.

If so, what do you use?

Sabby
06-10-2009, 03:46 PM
Yes I have an old cross country ski pole that I use, only one. It has a carbide point that stays put when set down on rock. Also good for "poking".

Team V3
06-10-2009, 03:53 PM
I am not a regular distance hiker but sometimes I wonder if at least a staff would be beneficial for me to have as an extra tool when going over some of the rougher spots or like you said as a poker. Not sure if I should go for the one staff or a pair of poles.

hollora
06-10-2009, 05:56 PM
I have a nice hiking pole which collapses (convenient for travel and storage). My son gave me this as a gift (Mother's Day, I think). It has a metal pick on the tip which I use year round. It's just remembering to take it with me. Dave (bgrffdave) has also shown me how to use two poles walking down a mountain......I just can't get the rhythm right....not yet......and I don't have 2 poles (yet).

pjpreb
06-10-2009, 06:24 PM
We both have a set of hiking poles and they are awesome for saving the knees on a downhill hike. 100% recomended. We have a "good" set and an "inexpensive" set. They are both functional so save yourself some money.

hide_from_the_kids
06-10-2009, 06:37 PM
i got one at walmart and it worked great till one of my kids got it now i got to buy a new one. so if you buy one make sure you get one for the kids to use.

TRF
06-10-2009, 06:45 PM
Hey. I was wondering how many of you out there use a staff or hiking poles when you are in the trails.

If so, what do you use?

Yes, I found a straight length of Ash and wrapped the "tip" in metal. I have only my labor invested and have had it for several years. I've even carved my monikor into it and decorated it.

tandemstoker
06-10-2009, 07:06 PM
Recently I saw a beautiful one in use on a trail in the White Mountains. It was crafted of wood and was embellished with lavender goatskin, brass tacks, and an amethyst colored faceted gem. However, the collapsible type are currently available at Mardens. (Approximately $8). They have both a metal point and a rubber crutch tip.

I think I would prefer the former, however, I can't seem to get around to making one. I guess I'm just too busy caching. ;)

cachecrashers4
06-10-2009, 08:25 PM
I use a staff that Joey made for me at school. It is a 5 1/2 foot length of bamboo. He put a copper tip on one end and a leather loop at the other end. He then woodburned all kinds of geocaching symbols and words on it. He put some coordinates on the staff that look good, but are actually somewhere in the middle of the Atlantic ocean (he may be trying to tell me something LOL). Its great when you need to balance yourself. It was really handy recently traversing the water hazard at the Yorktowne series.

kickenemymen
06-10-2009, 11:14 PM
I use a single collapsable one. I have some nice wooden ones as well but generally use the collapsable one because I can strap it to my backpack if necessary. It has a nice grip, a rubber tip to go over the metal one depending on hiking surface, and even a camera attachment to stabilize my camera. I've had it a while but I think I paid somewhere in the $40 range. I had a pair of cheaper ones but one bent and I no longer trusted the other.

Ekidokai
06-11-2009, 12:47 AM
I got one for the winter treks. My knees are no good and when one leg breaks through it helps out with getting up again and sometimes keeps me from taking a spill when bushwhacking. If I forget to bring it I'll pick up a stick to use.

Also good for poking.

hide_from_the_kids
06-11-2009, 07:46 AM
mapachi has a nice wooden one that he uses but we are thinking of investing in a padded bubble for him to use. :D

Team V3
06-11-2009, 08:37 AM
I work at L.L.Bean so I figure I can probably find a good one there too. Usually my legs are fine but every now and then they are a little more sensitive than usual. This may have something to do with being diabetic. Feet and legs are always something to watch out for when you are diabetic.

Cole has already told us he wants a "hiking stick". I have found this to be a pretty funny (but good) request from a 4 year old.

fins2right
06-11-2009, 10:15 AM
Last year we picked up 4 sticks at Mardens for a grand total of $32. The kids like to play with them. My wife and I don't use them that often, but the price was right. As is typical for Mardens, we had to search the bin to find 4 that were not broken, but the price was right. :rolleyes:


Mapachi's bubble (which is a great cache name, now I'm thinking... :rolleyes:) I'm picturing a 12 foot plastic bubble with a motorized chair pushing it along. It comes with 3 sliding doors and a 5 foot long mechanical arm for grabbing caches. Not a bad idea. :D:D:D

pm28570
06-11-2009, 11:17 AM
While I don't do long hikes or really vertical ones either, I'm thinking this makes sense for me as my arthritic knee and hip worsen. Get a walking stick, lose some weight and up the meds......should be good to go then. :rolleyes:

Ekidokai
06-11-2009, 11:28 AM
Last year we picked up 4 sticks at Mardens for a grand total of $32. The kids like to play with them. My wife and I don't use them that often, but the price was right. As is typical for Mardens, we had to search the bin to find 4 that were not broken, but the price was right. :rolleyes:


Mapachi's bubble (which is a great cache name, now I'm thinking... :rolleyes:) I'm picturing a 12 foot plastic bubble with a motorized chair pushing it along. It comes with 3 sliding doors and a 5 foot long mechanical arm for grabbing caches. Not a bad idea. :D:D:D

Oh my God! this is just too good.

Sudonim
06-11-2009, 06:23 PM
I use a single collapsable one. I have some nice wooden ones as well but generally use the collapsable one because I can strap it to my backpack if necessary. It has a nice grip, a rubber tip to go over the metal one depending on hiking surface, and even a camera attachment to stabilize my camera. I've had it a while but I think I paid somewhere in the $40 range. I had a pair of cheaper ones but one bent and I no longer trusted the other.

I like the camera attachment idea, you would always have a basic stand for those low light pictures.

kickenemymen
06-11-2009, 11:33 PM
I like the camera attachment idea, you would always have a basic stand for those low light pictures.

Or any photo you want to put yourself into when you're out alone.

eebee
06-16-2009, 07:29 AM
I had an inexpensive collapsible Swiss Army pole that I got at WalMart and it was great until something broke inside and now I can't get one of the sections tight enough to bear weight without collapsing. Now I use a pair of LL Bean snowshoeing poles, when I think to take them. It really does help, and an added benefit is that with poles you can end up getting more exercise in your arms and shoulders than you would get on a hike without them. They're also great for pushing brush aside, general poking around, and you might be able to use them to discourage any animals that want to come too close!

kickenemymen
06-16-2009, 01:47 PM
Just this past Sunday, I had some birds get startled in the woods and one charged at me, flapping and squawking. Thankfully, my voice and/or banging my pole on the ground in front of me made it stop as visions of having to somehow fight/defend against an angry bird flashed through my head.

I checked online and I'm pretty sure it was a grouse.

WhereRWe?
06-16-2009, 03:53 PM
I checked online and I'm pretty sure it was a grouse.

Probably had chicks nearby... :D:D