View Full Version : Hiking shoes



benandtina
10-05-2009, 11:28 AM
I think this is the appropriate place to ask this. I figure I have an entire forum of hikers at my fingertips, so I may as well ask you all for advice :)

I am a pretty clumsy person. Two months ago I tripped and hurt my ankle. Since then I've stumbled at least 15 times and made it hurt worse each time. Sometimes while hiking, other times while just walking around my house or office. My doctor says it's a minor sprain that isn't healing b/c I keep irritating it (he's doing xrays today to make sure it's nothing worse), but it's not swollen and isn't bad enough to stop me from doing most things. It is, however, a nuisance pain with pretty much each step.

There's not much I can do about my day-to-day clumsiness but I would like to get a hiking shoe that will give me some support during my caching clumsiness. Any tips?

I went to the LLBean store and they recommended these http://www.llbean.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CategoryDisplay?categoryId=61963&storeId=1&catalogId=1&langId=-1&parentCategory=503434&feat=503434-tn&cat4=505550. They didn't have any in stock for me to try on so I have ordered a pair and am waiting for them to be sent to me to try out. If I don't like them, does anyone know of something else I should try?

TRF
10-05-2009, 11:47 AM
I think this is the appropriate place to ask this. I figure I have an entire forum of hikers at my fingertips, so I may as well ask you all for advice :)

I am a pretty clumsy person. Two months ago I tripped and hurt my ankle. Since then I've stumbled at least 15 times and made it hurt worse each time. Sometimes while hiking, other times while just walking around my house or office. My doctor says it's a minor sprain that isn't healing b/c I keep irritating it (he's doing xrays today to make sure it's nothing worse), but it's not swollen and isn't bad enough to stop me from doing most things. It is, however, a nuisance pain with pretty much each step.

There's not much I can do about my day-to-day clumsiness but I would like to get a hiking shoe that will give me some support during my caching clumsiness. Any tips?

I went to the LLBean store and they recommended these http://www.llbean.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CategoryDisplay?categoryId=61963&storeId=1&catalogId=1&langId=-1&parentCategory=503434&feat=503434-tn&cat4=505550. They didn't have any in stock for me to try on so I have ordered a pair and am waiting for them to be sent to me to try out. If I don't like them, does anyone know of something else I should try?


A Walker (http://www.specialtymedicalsupply.com/skin1/images/cat/cat_land_rollator.gif)



:D:p:D:p

benandtina
10-05-2009, 11:48 AM
A Walker (http://www.specialtymedicalsupply.com/skin1/images/cat/cat_land_rollator.gif)



:D:p:D:p

That would just give me something to trip over :P

pm28570
10-05-2009, 11:50 AM
Undoubtedly there are many brands and styles available that will do what you need a hiking boot to do. That said, my two pieces of advice would be a higher boot (liked you've looked at) and most importantly, have someone fit you that hikes or is knowledgeable about fitting hiking boots. When I bought my first pair, the store had an incline you could walk up or down to determine how your foot moved in the boot. I found very helpful. I would imagine that if you're hiking with Attroll, then you would need a different boot than one that would be fine for a day caching and hiking. Once you've been fitted, then you can determine features and benefits. And.....don't forget about the right sock as well.
Choosing the right boot has made a difference for my arthritic and gout afflicted ankles.


I think this is the appropriate place to ask this. I figure I have an entire forum of hikers at my fingertips, so I may as well ask you all for advice :)

I am a pretty clumsy person. Two months ago I tripped and hurt my ankle. Since then I've stumbled at least 15 times and made it hurt worse each time. Sometimes while hiking, other times while just walking around my house or office. My doctor says it's a minor sprain that isn't healing b/c I keep irritating it (he's doing xrays today to make sure it's nothing worse), but it's not swollen and isn't bad enough to stop me from doing most things. It is, however, a nuisance pain with pretty much each step.

There's not much I can do about my day-to-day clumsiness but I would like to get a hiking shoe that will give me some support during my caching clumsiness. Any tips?

I went to the LLBean store and they recommended these http://www.llbean.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CategoryDisplay?categoryId=61963&storeId=1&catalogId=1&langId=-1&parentCategory=503434&feat=503434-tn&cat4=505550. They didn't have any in stock for me to try on so I have ordered a pair and am waiting for them to be sent to me to try out. If I don't like them, does anyone know of something else I should try?

benandtina
10-05-2009, 11:54 AM
The lady at LLBean hikes and she helped me try on the shoe. They did not have that one in stock, but they had the lower-cut version available. She used the low cut shoe to help me determine my size, which turned out to be smaller than my usual shoe size. I walked on the incline they had at the store (I even tripped on it by mistake, haha) but she said it's hard to get an actual idea of how much support the higher ankle will give me.

Team V3
10-05-2009, 12:18 PM
Personally I use the Low Cut Trail Model Hikers (not the waterproof version) and they are extremely comfortable.

http://www.llbean.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CategoryDisplay?categoryId=58644&storeId=1&catalogId=1&langId=-1&from=SR&feat=sr

I have no complaints. However, I do plan experimenting with different insoles to see if they make it even better. As I am diabetic, the feet are very important for me.

Truthfully, every person is different and I suggest that you try different shoes out. I do recommend Bean as an option though and I am NOT just saying that because I work there. :)

attroll
10-05-2009, 12:33 PM
If you are prone to ankle injury or problems then you should get the higher boot because it provides ankle support.

As far a brands, you will get many different responses form different people. I went to LL Beans for my first pair of hiking boots (Cresta's) because they received high reviews. I had them for quite a few years but never really liked them. I kept using them thinking they just took longer to break in. I finally gave up and switch to a different brand. If your hiking shoe is not comfortable after wearing them for a couple of weeks then they are not the shoe for you. The good thing about LL Bean is if you don't like them you can always take them back and get a store refund. Keep your receipt.

I boot I ended up going with is a high cut Vasque Breeze. This is what works for me but not for everyone.

pm28570
10-05-2009, 12:39 PM
Rick, out of curiousity, will one pair suffice for your upcoming trek, start to end?



I boot I ended up going with is a high cut Vasque Breeze. This is what works for me but not for everyone.

attroll
10-05-2009, 01:02 PM
Rick, out of curiousity, will one pair suffice for your upcoming trek, start to end?
I am not sure.

Most of the people I have talked to said they have gone through at least two pairs of hiking shoes for this hike. Some people have gone through three or four pair.

I was debating on having a second pair here at the house in case I did go through a pair, then I could have the wife send me the extra pair. But a lot of the AT hikers I have talked to in the past said your feet sometimes get bigger on a trek like this so I figured I better not.

pjpreb
10-05-2009, 01:21 PM
My experience is that Merrills are very slippery (don't have a good tread traction pattern) and North Face is my brand of choice. I use "Superfeet" insoles in my hikers and sneakers after a foot stress fracture and tendonitis a couple of years ago. Having shared this info, I agree that there are as many solutions as there are people. What works for one may not be right for someone else.

Team V3
10-05-2009, 01:41 PM
I definitely agree that you want the higher cut for ankle support. For me, the low cut works fine as any pains I often suffer from are in the foot itself.

Haffy
10-05-2009, 02:00 PM
I've got a pair of waterproof 3/4 "Hi-Tec's" that I bought at Walmart almost 5 years ago and they are the most comfortable boots I've ever had and having been wearing really well too. For less than 40 bux too so I can't complain.

pm28570
10-05-2009, 02:38 PM
Something else to consider is use trekking poles or walking stick(s). Relatively inexpensive and helps quite a bit by offering a little more stability. You're welcome to try mine if you would like.

Trick or Treat
10-05-2009, 07:19 PM
I am not sure.

Most of the people I have talked to said they have gone through at least two pairs of hiking shoes for this hike. Some people have gone through three or four pair.

I was debating on having a second pair here at the house in case I did go through a pair, then I could have the wife send me the extra pair. But a lot of the AT hikers I have talked to in the past said your feet sometimes get bigger on a trek like this so I figured I better not.

A friend of mine did the AT a few years ago and I asked him this exact question. What he did was find the hiking boots that were the best for him and bought two extra pairs. He broke in all three before he left and had someone send the two extra pairs when he needed them. He went through all three pair and said that having them already broke in when he received them made all the difference.

WhereRWe?
10-05-2009, 07:35 PM
I've got a pair of waterproof 3/4 "Hi-Tec's" that I bought at Walmart almost 5 years ago and they are the most comfortable boots I've ever had and having been wearing really well too.

Which reminds me... WalMart is hiring. :p:p

pm28570
10-05-2009, 08:30 PM
I was wondering about the breaking in part. I've got a pair of Bean's that I've had for a while and I can't seem to get them broken in like I want. Great support, just can't get 'em where I want.



A friend of mine did the AT a few years ago and I asked him this exact question. What he did was find the hiking boots that were the best for him and bought two extra pairs. He broke in all three before he left and had someone send the two extra pairs when he needed them. He went through all three pair and said that having them already broke in when he received them made all the difference.

squirrelcache
10-05-2009, 09:10 PM
I know alot of serious hikers in New England, esp. peak baggers. On their suggestion I looked into the matter at LLBean. The employees there can sometimes walk 8 plus miles in a shift and wear these boots Inside! So I bought some and am surprised how comfy they can be. They're gore-tex lined and leather upper...not to mention the Bean's guarantee which is awesome! I know many that hike through the winter w/them! Check out the Italian made Cresta. Out of 40 reviews @ Bean's online..95% would recommend them, and many are on their second or more pair of them.

hide_from_the_kids
10-09-2009, 11:11 PM
i would just go with what feels right. i never had luck at beans' because they tend not to have my size but have had good luck with new balance http://www.nbwebexpress.com/category.asp?type=MNFTOTHI&perPg=48&showDetails=no maybe not what your looking for but an option. there is an outlet store in skowegan.

Zoltarus
10-10-2009, 03:08 PM
Asolo Boots are the best I have warn. They are a bit more than most people want to spend, but they last and require almost no break-in.

Your feet may be different, however, and each brand uses a different mold to shape their boots.