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Thread: Caching in the Snow

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  1. #1

    Default Caching in the Snow

    This may have been discussed in the past, and, if so, I apologize. Yesterday, in weather much too cold to be outside in the first place, I went caching in Southern Maine. The first cache was located in a fence about 2 feet above the snow and, therefore, easily found. The next two were probably buried in the base of a sign and in a stone wall, but I couldn't find either of them because I couldn't get to either base of the sign or the wall because of the snow and ice. Had I known these caches were not accessible when there is snow/ice on the ground, I would have skipped those caches until the spring. So, is there a way for cache owners to indicate the "snow accessibility" of their caches?

  2. #2
    d’76 Guest

    Default

    Girlmate and I found our first 100 caches in the snow and yes some where rather unpleasant and they took forever to find and wet cold hands where almost guanranteed. I use the attributes on the cache page when you are creating it for approval. THere is a snow flake indicating winter friendly and a snow flake with a red line through it indicating not winter friendly. I to wish they where used more to aid in decision making for winter caching. Dont give up and bring a pick.

  3. #3

    Default Winter Friendly

    Thanks, Dave, I had never noticed the snowflake in the cache description, so I went back and checked the two cache descriptions I had been looking for. One was marked "Winter Friendly" and the other one wasn't tagged at all. Your comment about people using the attributes more often (and more accurately, I might add) is right on target. Thanks for the help.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Brewer,ME
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    2,574

    Question Winter friendy or not?

    As Dave said there are attributes available for the hiders to use as well as the finders. I may or may not look at them before I decide to seek a cache. However when I'm out in the field I most likely don't look at them. When using a PDA it doesn't much matter since it doesn't display the attributes anyway.
    Happy Trails!
    Yeah it's a Jeep thing!


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Gainesville, Georgia
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    Default

    Just remember to bring something to poke around in the snow like a ski pole or even a hiking stick. When you hear that familiar thud or clinking sound you are probably on the cache.
    Just smile it won't crack your face

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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    ME
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    Default

    Agreed and snow or no snow, I like my walking stick! It has helped many times.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Maine
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    1,972

    Default first 50 in the snow

    We would only go after a cache in the snow, if the hint would really help us to find it. I think the technical term is " pokey stick ". A must have for winter caching. Look hard and you will find tons of winter caches in So.Maine. Try the 101 Dalmatians Series. Not much to look at, but it helps with the numbers. Good luck and dress for the weather.
    Why not live life like it is your last day....instead of pretending to be a member of the Peter Pan Club and believing you will be around forever.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Auburn,Maine
    Posts
    438

    Default

    When finding Winter caches be sure to leave plenty of tracks to confuse muggles as well as other cachers.

    YOP

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Cape Elizabeth, Maine
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    391

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ye Olde Prospector View Post
    When finding Winter caches be sure to leave plenty of tracks to confuse muggles as well as other cachers.

    YOP
    You mean intentionally, right? I usually do a good enough job unintentionally - like on stages 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and the final today at Thorne Head. Oh wait... I actually walked up to each stage THEN added all those other tracks

  10. #10

    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by kayakerinme View Post
    You mean intentionally, right? I usually do a good enough job unintentionally - like on stages 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and the final today at Thorne Head. Oh wait... I actually walked up to each stage THEN added all those other tracks

    LoL... Thats the best part of geocaching in the snow....looking at a birds eye view of how your geo-senses were working that day.

    I use a little garden trowel for caching in the winter. I attach it w/ a carabiner to my pack and wrap an old glove or sock around it so as to not stab myself. Its not too intrusive to lug around and it works great for getting those little micros out of their frozen hidey holes. It has helped me alot although I snapped off a third of my trowel when I was caching in very cold weather one day trying to pry an ammo can out from under a log. Although aluminum trowels are light weight, they do not hold up as well in winter.
    "It may be that your soul purpose in life is simply to serve as a warning to others" ~Steven Wright~
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