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Thread: RE: OT Oil Boilers

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hiram357 View Post
    I've heard decent things about those "system 2000" units too, I'd be cautious about those outdoor woodfired units, there's been quite the fuss lately about those from people that don't like (such as towns passing ordanances to prevent using them because the smoke bothers people...)

    my best advice to you though is; you get what you pay for, and the most expensive doesn't always mean the best. (I know, it's a bit contradicting, but make sure you check out the history of the contractor and the unit ya wanna buy)
    I am actually more interested in the indoor wood-fired boilers as they seem to be more efficient (i.e. use less wood) and are cleaner-burning . . . but again that would be something down the road possibly.
    "Courage is not the absence of fear, but the realization that there is something more important than fear."

    "Death is only one of many ways to die."

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by firefighterjake View Post
    I am actually more interested in the indoor wood-fired boilers as they seem to be more efficient (i.e. use less wood) and are cleaner-burning . . . but again that would be something down the road possibly.
    don't forget about all the hard work it takes to find someone to cut and stack your wood for you...
    Once the game is over, the king and the pawn go back in the same box.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Haffy View Post
    Maybe a combo oil and wood or something like that.
    Speak to a heating contractor and they will probably tell you NOT to go with a "combo unit". What they usually recommend is having 2 separate units - oil/wood - with 2 separate chimney flues (now required by insurance companies, I believe).

    One thing about wood heat, though: it heats you twice! LOL!

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by firefighterjake View Post
    I may go with an add-on wood boiler in the future (as some of you might recall I started a thread on add-on wood boilers about a year ago) in an effort to use less oil (plus I have access to a woodlot and am a bit twisted in that I enjoy the work that comes with putting up a few cord of wood), but for now I'm simply looking for a decent oil boiler that will work for one entire year without it conking out once or twice a winter (reliability is the one key feature I'm looking for.)
    We have a "New Yorker" wood boiler that has been running for 16 years with no problems. Compact, simple, efficient...

    http://www.newyorkerboiler.com/wc.cfm

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by WhereRWe? View Post
    One thing about wood heat, though: it heats you twice! LOL!
    Three times if a spark catches your house on fire and FFJ is out caching!
    DNFTT! DNFTT! DNFTT!

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  6. #16
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    Beware System 2000 - it has a very spendy control board that you don't want to have to replace as most technicians won't have one on the truck (which means a chilly wait while they order one for you).

    Bruce is right about the red tape with a combo unit - about the seperate flues - and you also may need a technician with a dual license to tune it up (Solid Fuel license and #2 Heating Oil license). Unless you can do that job yourself or use a contractor that doesn't give a hoot about code compliance.

    Ok - someone kick that soapbox out from under my feet....
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  7. #17
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    Just what do you have for a boiler now? How old? Firing rate? Number of zones? Type of Burner? What type of domestic hot water? What's wrong with it?
    DNFTT! DNFTT! DNFTT!

    "The funniest thing about this particular signature is that by the time you realize it doesn't say anything it's to late to stop reading it..."

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hiram357 View Post
    don't forget about all the hard work it takes to find someone to cut and stack your wood for you...
    Oh, but I really enjoy working with wood . . . if I get mad there's nothing like taking it out on the woodpile by slinging wood around!
    "Courage is not the absence of fear, but the realization that there is something more important than fear."

    "Death is only one of many ways to die."

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by WhereRWe? View Post
    Speak to a heating contractor and they will probably tell you NOT to go with a "combo unit". What they usually recommend is having 2 separate units - oil/wood - with 2 separate chimney flues (now required by insurance companies, I believe).

    One thing about wood heat, though: it heats you twice! LOL!
    That's what I would most likely do . . . my own belief is that by keeping things separate it makes thing simpler and less likely to break.

    I also believe that the more "tasks" you ask of an appliance the greater chance it will be less efficient at doing any one task . . . in other words a Swiss Army knife may come with a spoon, screwdriver and a knife . . . but the spoon is small, the screwdriver doesn't allow you to get as good a grip as you would with a traditional screwdriver and the knife may not be as good or sharp as a stand-alone knife . . . that's not to say the SAK is no good, since if you need a spoon, screwdriver or knife in one compact package or in a pinch it works well enough . . . it's just not the best tool for every job.
    "Courage is not the absence of fear, but the realization that there is something more important than fear."

    "Death is only one of many ways to die."

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by pjpreb View Post
    Beware System 2000 - it has a very spendy control board that you don't want to have to replace as most technicians won't have one on the truck (which means a chilly wait while they order one for you).

    Bruce is right about the red tape with a combo unit - about the seperate flues - and you also may need a technician with a dual license to tune it up (Solid Fuel license and #2 Heating Oil license). Unless you can do that job yourself or use a contractor that doesn't give a hoot about code compliance.

    Ok - someone kick that soapbox out from under my feet....
    This is the type of thing I wanted to know about . . . and to be honest I have been a little leery of the S-2000 electronics since previous experience has shown me that very often more complex = more likely to not work well . . . one of the reasons I went back to a traditional thermostat versus the electronic programmable thermostat in my upstairs bedrooms.
    "Courage is not the absence of fear, but the realization that there is something more important than fear."

    "Death is only one of many ways to die."

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