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Thread: Geo Caching Safety

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    DownEast, Maine
    Posts
    5

    Default Geo Caching Safety

    I am new to Geo Caching, but one concern I have is safety.Today there seems to be heavy security concerns everywhere you travel. Everyone is concerned about the next terrorist attack that will happen. So my thought is what safety steps can a geo cacher take both in setting up a new cache or searching for caches to prevent against the rough "geo cache terrorist" from booby trapping a cache with something harmful? I know the majority of malicious people in the world probably would not be hiking in the back woods for the sole purpose of modifying a geo cache to be harmful, but what are some thoughts or expierences of those who have been geo caching for a while? Bad things happen and I would rather not be on the news as the unnamed geo cacher that was sent to the hospital or mourge from lack of experience or attention to safety.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Albion, Maine
    Posts
    324

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Wolf207 View Post
    I am new to Geo Caching, but one concern I have is safety.Today there seems to be heavy security concerns everywhere you travel. Everyone is concerned about the next terrorist attack that will happen. So my thought is what safety steps can a geo cacher take both in setting up a new cache or searching for caches to prevent against the rough "geo cache terrorist" from booby trapping a cache with something harmful? I know the majority of malicious people in the world probably would not be hiking in the back woods for the sole purpose of modifying a geo cache to be harmful, but what are some thoughts or expierences of those who have been geo caching for a while? Bad things happen and I would rather not be on the news as the unnamed geo cacher that was sent to the hospital or mourge from lack of experience or attention to safety.
    Common sense will prevail. If something seems unsafe or out of the ordinary, avoid it. When considering terrorist attacks, there is no sign that one can tell you to look for. There are no rules to follow in this case.

    Things to consider though. Terrorist usually strike to cause the most amount of terror. Generally speaking, a terrorist most likely wouldn't set up a geocache as a trap as it would only effect the one person (small group) who went to it. There are always the exception to that though and not all terrorist are jihadist either. Environmental terrorist and so on.

    Also, I wouldn't recommend that you put an ammo can geocache on a bridge or next to a public building. Definately don't put out containers with wires sticki9ng out of it...lol.

    Goes back to what I first said, Common Sense.
    There are only two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle.~~Albert Einstein
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Many wise words are spoken in jest, but they don't compare with the number of stupid words spoken in earnest. - Sam Levenson (1911 - 1980)

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Auburn
    Posts
    2,113

    Default

    The most dangerous part of geocaching is probably getting to the cache! Be careful driving: Don't get distracted with your gps!

    When looking for a cache, try to think about how non-cachers will perceive your actions. Many times, a cache page will say "stealth is required". And, while no one wants to see a cache go missing because a non cacher removed it, causing alarm may also get a cache removed!

    When placing a cache, be sure to mark the outside with a Geocaching sticker. In urban areas, it may be better to use a clear container rather than an ammo box.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Unity, Maine
    Posts
    3,866

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tat View Post
    The most dangerous part of geocaching is probably getting to the cache! Be careful driving: Don't get distracted with your gps!

    When looking for a cache, try to think about how non-cachers will perceive your actions. Many times, a cache page will say "stealth is required". And, while no one wants to see a cache go missing because a non cacher removed it, causing alarm may also get a cache removed!

    When placing a cache, be sure to mark the outside with a Geocaching sticker. In urban areas, it may be better to use a clear container rather than an ammo box.
    I agree 100% . . . it's way too easy to get distracted by the GPSr on the way to the cache while driving.

    I also agree with TAT when he says caches should be marked whenever possible . . . especially ammo cans or other similar containers.

    In terms of safety, I wouldn't be too worried about booby-trapped cache containers . . . although I have heard some stories about some kids that were well. . . uh . . . leaving some rather unpleasant messes in caches -- make that disgusting messes in caches . . . but I believe this was before my time.

    A real issue in terms of safety and containers is that some folks put some strange things in caches sometimes . . . things like broken glass (beats me why someone would think there is value in something like that).

    Honestly, when thinking safety I think one of the biggest things to consider (other than Tat's suggestion to concentrate on driving . . . this is why I love having the Hiram Hiram along as my navigator when driving (a Hiram Hiram is kind of like a Tom Tom only it makes guttural sounds to indicate which way to turn or where to stop and it always seems to direct me to a Sports Bar and Grill of some sort) . . . is to be aware of one's limitations . . . not every cache is going to be an easy walk . . . some caches will have you scrambling along the side of steep cliffs (yes, Laughing Terry, I'm thinking of your Deathwish Cache!)
    "Courage is not the absence of fear, but the realization that there is something more important than fear."

    "Death is only one of many ways to die."

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    abbot me
    Posts
    754

    Default

    (a Hiram Hiram is kind of like a Tom Tom only it makes guttural sounds to indicate which way to turn or where to stop and it always seems to direct me to a Sports Bar and Grill of some sort)
    Yeah liking pointing left in front of my face and yelling. Right! Right! As we approach an intersection.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    1,972

    Thumbs up hiking caution.....

    My words of wisdom come from experience. When you get ready to hike into the woods, remember. Even though the GPS says it is only 2.1 miles. That is "as the crow flies" miles. The real distance may not be in a straight line and a lot longer than you had anticipated. Be prepared. I like to use a day pack with things like a small first aid kit, flashlight, and I can always find a power bar buried somewhere in there.

    Welcome to the site and a very addicting sport. We hope you enjoy this as much as we have.
    Why not live life like it is your last day....instead of pretending to be a member of the Peter Pan Club and believing you will be around forever.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Canaan , Maine
    Posts
    498

    Default

    [quote=Team2hunt;42036]My words of wisdom come from experience. When you get ready to hike into the woods, remember. Even though the GPS says it is only 2.1 miles. That is "as the crow flies" miles.

    When using the HIRAM HIRAM, it's as the Parrot flies.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Auburn, Maine
    Posts
    621

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Team2hunt View Post
    My words of wisdom come from experience. When you get ready to hike into the woods, remember. Even though the GPS says it is only 2.1 miles. That is "as the crow flies" miles. The real distance may not be in a straight line and a lot longer than you had anticipated. Be prepared. I like to use a day pack with things like a small first aid kit, flashlight, and I can always find a power bar buried somewhere in there.

    Welcome to the site and a very addicting sport. We hope you enjoy this as much as we have.

    We also carry and Epi Pen for a severe bee sting allergy. I read a horrible story about a caching family (from the Brunswick area I think) that had a very bad encounter with ground wasps. Our new found "glad we have that" is hiking poles for those downhill knee killers.
    If you want to try cross country skiing, start with a small country

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    1,972

    Default you know your getting older......

    Quote Originally Posted by pjpreb View Post
    We also carry and Epi Pen for a severe bee sting allergy. I read a horrible story about a caching family (from the Brunswick area I think) that had a very bad encounter with ground wasps. Our new found "glad we have that" is hiking poles for those downhill knee killers.
    when you complain about the downhill as much as the uphill climb.

    I think there is a thread that talks about..."what do you take caching with you". I couldn't find it.........DAVE1976!!! ( he finds everything )
    Why not live life like it is your last day....instead of pretending to be a member of the Peter Pan Club and believing you will be around forever.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Houlton,Maine
    Posts
    25

    Thumbs up

    My suggestions to take along on the hike; The girls and I learned some of this the hard way on the first cache hike at Shakford Head in Eastport, Maine.

    of course this depends on how far it is from your truck. And it seems like every one carries a cell phone everywhere.

    Take a reading of where you park your truck this is helpful so that if necessary you may bushwack back if you lose a trail.

    Items that we find are good to take along:
    Flashlight, Water, Flagging tape, pencils or pens, fly spray, small first aid kit, jack knife, extra batteries, zip-loc bags, some other things that I can not think of now.

    Keep an old backpack loaded and ready to go. Replace items after each hike to make it easy for the next hike.

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