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Thread: Should warnings be required (dangerous plant)?

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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Brunswick, ME
    Posts
    64

    Default Should warnings be required (dangerous plant)?

    I was caching in NJ over the holiday. I went to a nature trail area that had 4 or 5 caches. The first cache was an easy find. But the second cache was a different story. The caches name is "sting" GC116GQ. I walked to where the coordinates took me and as I was reaching for what I thought might be the cache my hand touched a plant that sent pain jabbing into me. For two days I couldn't make the pain stop. I don't know what the plant is. Maybe if I was a native to the area I would but I'm not. Shouldn't there have been a warning on this cache!!

    I avoided the next two caches because that plant was everywhere.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Bowdoinham, Maine
    Posts
    389

    Default

    Absolutely. The kids and I went to a cache on an island that had a warning specifically not to bring kids because of stinging plants. Mom was the only one who got caught up in them but the warning was there and the kids were careful.
    Slowly but surely

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Solon, Maine
    Posts
    5,940

    Default

    Stinging Nettle. There's a lot of it in Maine, too.

    Actually, based on the cache name, I don't think the cache should have been approved. Perhaps our local approver could comment...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Auburn
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    2,112

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by WhereRWe? View Post
    ...Perhaps our local approver could comment...
    Sorry I didn't post sooner, but I've been out caching, hiking and kayaking!!

    Geocaching, hiking, backpacking, and other outdoor activities involve risk to both persons and property. There are many variables including, but not limited to, weather, fitness level, terrain features and outdoor experience, that must be considered prior to seeking or placing a cache. Be prepared for Your journey and be sure to check the current weather and conditions before heading outdoors. Always exercise common sense and caution. You assume all risks arising in connection with seeking a cache or any other related activity.

    I suspect most reviewers would not appreciate anyone mis-leading cachers into a dangerous situation.

    Never attempt any cache you are not comfortable with.
    The farmer gave permission to place the cache in the field, but the bull charges.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    ME
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    3,517

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    Quote Originally Posted by balinda View Post
    I was caching in NJ over the holiday. I went to a nature trail area that had 4 or 5 caches. The first cache was an easy find. But the second cache was a different story. The caches name is "sting" GC116GQ. I walked to where the coordinates took me and as I was reaching for what I thought might be the cache my hand touched a plant that sent pain jabbing into me. For two days I couldn't make the pain stop. I don't know what the plant is. Maybe if I was a native to the area I would but I'm not. Shouldn't there have been a warning on this cache!!

    I avoided the next two caches because that plant was everywhere.
    It sounds like WhereAreWe? is right on - as others at that cache have identified it as Nettle in their log.

    Wikipedia has some good information about the plant and how it stings - here is the information about the itch - "If stung by a nettle effective anti-itch drugs are available, usually in the form of creams containing antihistaminics or hydrocortisone. Many ineffective folk remedies exist for treating the itching, including horsetail (Equisetopsida spp.), leaf of dock (Rumex spp.), Jewelweed (Impatiens capensis and Impatiens pallida), mud, saliva, baking soda[9], or calamine lotion. These methods can cause short relief only through mechanical stimulation such as rubbing or scratching or by cooling."

    Hope this helps.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Solon, Maine
    Posts
    5,940

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    And it's good to eat, too.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Canaan , Maine
    Posts
    498

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    Quote Originally Posted by WhereRWe? View Post
    And it's good to eat, too.
    Where's Eule Gibbons when we need him????

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Bangor, ME
    Posts
    6,059

    Default How many warnings should cache hiders give???

    While I agree it's a nice gesture to give warning when possible, I think for the most part it should be up to the cache finder to be aware of his surroundings and keep a sharp eye out, especially when in an area you are not accustomed to.

    The cache mentioned in the opening post was hidden in February, so the cache hider could have been unaware of it's existence when it was hidden. It is also an area where the plant is common enough that the hider felt local cachers would notice it without warning. It could be that the hider didn't want to give the cache location away by mentioning it was hidden near the plants. Obviously, the hider could have edited the page after reading the logs if they so chose.

    If cache hiders warned of every danger cache descriptions would be 6 pages long, especially if we considered that there might be visitors to the cache that have no idea of Maine's dangers. Every Maine cache would need a "Watch the ice in Winter" warning; Guard rail caches would need a "Watch out for moving traffic" warning; Light Pole caches would need a "Danger of Electrocution" Warning; Mountain caches would need a "Falling from the top of this mountain could be deadly" warning; Micro caches would need a "Danger of boring cache" warning (I just had to add some humor in there ).

    Anyway, IMO it comes down to personal responsibility. If you are going somewhere where there are likely to be animals or plants or other dangers you are not used to, it is up to you to do some research so you an prevent harm.

    So, simply stated, it's nice when cache hiders give warning, but it's safer to be informed.
    DNFTT! DNFTT! DNFTT!

    "The funniest thing about this particular signature is that by the time you realize it doesn't say anything it's to late to stop reading it..."

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Solon, Maine
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    5,940

    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by brdad View Post
    The cache mentioned in the opening post was hidden in February, so the cache hider could have been unaware of it's existence when it was hidden. It is also an area where the plant is common enough that the hider felt local cachers would notice it without warning. It could be that the hider didn't want to give the cache location away by mentioning it was hidden near the plants.
    I disagree. The fact that the cache was named "Sting" means that the cacher knew EXACTLY what plants were in the area, and probably thought it would be a great laugh to see the logs about people getting "stung".

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    ME
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    3,517

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    I think I read crushing the plant renders the pricks unable to hurt you. Regardless, I am a chicken and would stay away.

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