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Thread: Hiking shoes

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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2009
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    Default Hiking shoes

    I think this is the appropriate place to ask this. I figure I have an entire forum of hikers at my fingertips, so I may as well ask you all for advice

    I am a pretty clumsy person. Two months ago I tripped and hurt my ankle. Since then I've stumbled at least 15 times and made it hurt worse each time. Sometimes while hiking, other times while just walking around my house or office. My doctor says it's a minor sprain that isn't healing b/c I keep irritating it (he's doing xrays today to make sure it's nothing worse), but it's not swollen and isn't bad enough to stop me from doing most things. It is, however, a nuisance pain with pretty much each step.

    There's not much I can do about my day-to-day clumsiness but I would like to get a hiking shoe that will give me some support during my caching clumsiness. Any tips?

    I went to the LLBean store and they recommended these http://www.llbean.com/webapp/wcs/sto...tn&cat4=505550. They didn't have any in stock for me to try on so I have ordered a pair and am waiting for them to be sent to me to try out. If I don't like them, does anyone know of something else I should try?

  2. #2
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    Apr 2008
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    Albion, Maine
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    Quote Originally Posted by benandtina View Post
    I think this is the appropriate place to ask this. I figure I have an entire forum of hikers at my fingertips, so I may as well ask you all for advice

    I am a pretty clumsy person. Two months ago I tripped and hurt my ankle. Since then I've stumbled at least 15 times and made it hurt worse each time. Sometimes while hiking, other times while just walking around my house or office. My doctor says it's a minor sprain that isn't healing b/c I keep irritating it (he's doing xrays today to make sure it's nothing worse), but it's not swollen and isn't bad enough to stop me from doing most things. It is, however, a nuisance pain with pretty much each step.

    There's not much I can do about my day-to-day clumsiness but I would like to get a hiking shoe that will give me some support during my caching clumsiness. Any tips?

    I went to the LLBean store and they recommended these http://www.llbean.com/webapp/wcs/sto...tn&cat4=505550. They didn't have any in stock for me to try on so I have ordered a pair and am waiting for them to be sent to me to try out. If I don't like them, does anyone know of something else I should try?

    A Walker



    There are only two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle.~~Albert Einstein
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Many wise words are spoken in jest, but they don't compare with the number of stupid words spoken in earnest. - Sam Levenson (1911 - 1980)

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Orlando, Florida
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    Quote Originally Posted by TRF View Post
    That would just give me something to trip over :P

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Hampden, ME
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    Default

    Undoubtedly there are many brands and styles available that will do what you need a hiking boot to do. That said, my two pieces of advice would be a higher boot (liked you've looked at) and most importantly, have someone fit you that hikes or is knowledgeable about fitting hiking boots. When I bought my first pair, the store had an incline you could walk up or down to determine how your foot moved in the boot. I found very helpful. I would imagine that if you're hiking with Attroll, then you would need a different boot than one that would be fine for a day caching and hiking. Once you've been fitted, then you can determine features and benefits. And.....don't forget about the right sock as well.
    Choosing the right boot has made a difference for my arthritic and gout afflicted ankles.

    Quote Originally Posted by benandtina View Post
    I think this is the appropriate place to ask this. I figure I have an entire forum of hikers at my fingertips, so I may as well ask you all for advice

    I am a pretty clumsy person. Two months ago I tripped and hurt my ankle. Since then I've stumbled at least 15 times and made it hurt worse each time. Sometimes while hiking, other times while just walking around my house or office. My doctor says it's a minor sprain that isn't healing b/c I keep irritating it (he's doing xrays today to make sure it's nothing worse), but it's not swollen and isn't bad enough to stop me from doing most things. It is, however, a nuisance pain with pretty much each step.

    There's not much I can do about my day-to-day clumsiness but I would like to get a hiking shoe that will give me some support during my caching clumsiness. Any tips?

    I went to the LLBean store and they recommended these http://www.llbean.com/webapp/wcs/sto...tn&cat4=505550. They didn't have any in stock for me to try on so I have ordered a pair and am waiting for them to be sent to me to try out. If I don't like them, does anyone know of something else I should try?
    Everyone has the right to be an idiot at times. Just don't abuse the privilege.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Orlando, Florida
    Posts
    285

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    The lady at LLBean hikes and she helped me try on the shoe. They did not have that one in stock, but they had the lower-cut version available. She used the low cut shoe to help me determine my size, which turned out to be smaller than my usual shoe size. I walked on the incline they had at the store (I even tripped on it by mistake, haha) but she said it's hard to get an actual idea of how much support the higher ankle will give me.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Huntersville, NC
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    416

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    Personally I use the Low Cut Trail Model Hikers (not the waterproof version) and they are extremely comfortable.

    http://www.llbean.com/webapp/wcs/sto...rom=SR&feat=sr

    I have no complaints. However, I do plan experimenting with different insoles to see if they make it even better. As I am diabetic, the feet are very important for me.

    Truthfully, every person is different and I suggest that you try different shoes out. I do recommend Bean as an option though and I am NOT just saying that because I work there.
    "Keep on reaching for the stars. You may find that someday you can pull yourself out of the gutter."

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Litchfield, Maine
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    3,589

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    If you are prone to ankle injury or problems then you should get the higher boot because it provides ankle support.

    As far a brands, you will get many different responses form different people. I went to LL Beans for my first pair of hiking boots (Cresta's) because they received high reviews. I had them for quite a few years but never really liked them. I kept using them thinking they just took longer to break in. I finally gave up and switch to a different brand. If your hiking shoe is not comfortable after wearing them for a couple of weeks then they are not the shoe for you. The good thing about LL Bean is if you don't like them you can always take them back and get a store refund. Keep your receipt.

    I boot I ended up going with is a high cut Vasque Breeze. This is what works for me but not for everyone.
    Blazing Troll

  8. #8
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    Jul 2008
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    Hampden, ME
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    Rick, out of curiousity, will one pair suffice for your upcoming trek, start to end?

    Quote Originally Posted by attroll View Post
    I boot I ended up going with is a high cut Vasque Breeze. This is what works for me but not for everyone.
    Everyone has the right to be an idiot at times. Just don't abuse the privilege.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
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    Litchfield, Maine
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    Quote Originally Posted by pm28570 View Post
    Rick, out of curiousity, will one pair suffice for your upcoming trek, start to end?
    I am not sure.

    Most of the people I have talked to said they have gone through at least two pairs of hiking shoes for this hike. Some people have gone through three or four pair.

    I was debating on having a second pair here at the house in case I did go through a pair, then I could have the wife send me the extra pair. But a lot of the AT hikers I have talked to in the past said your feet sometimes get bigger on a trek like this so I figured I better not.
    Blazing Troll

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Auburn, Maine
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    621

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    My experience is that Merrills are very slippery (don't have a good tread traction pattern) and North Face is my brand of choice. I use "Superfeet" insoles in my hikers and sneakers after a foot stress fracture and tendonitis a couple of years ago. Having shared this info, I agree that there are as many solutions as there are people. What works for one may not be right for someone else.
    If you want to try cross country skiing, start with a small country

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